UN’s Sustainable Development Calls For ‘Deep Transformation’

Sustainable Development represents the final plundering of the planet by the global elite, and the lockdown of Technocracy, or Scientific Dictatorship. The UN has been using the term ‘deep transformation’ for years but people have paid no attention to what it implies. ⁃ TN Editor

The Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change call for deep transformations that require complementary actions by governments, civil society, science, and business. IIASA contributed to a new study outlining six major transformations that will be required to achieve these ambitious goals.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focus on time-bound targets for prosperity, people, planet, peace, and partnership — collectively known as the five Ps. By adopting the 2030 Agenda with its 17 SDGs and the Paris Climate Agreement, UN member states effectively created a framework for national action and global cooperation on sustainable development, while the Paris Agreement committed signatory countries to achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by the middle of the century. SDG 13 on climate change specifically links to the Paris Agreement noting that the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change “is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.” Despite the interconnectivity and clear aims of these global goals, stakeholders seem to lack a shared understanding of how the 17 SDGs can be operationalized.

Building on previous work by The World in 2050 — a global research initiative established by IIASA — the authors of the study published in the journal Nature Sustainability propose six transformations to organize SDG interventions through a semi-modular action agenda that can be designed by discrete, yet interacting, parts of government. According to the paper, the proposed framework may be operationalized within the structures of governments while still respecting the strong interdependencies across the 17 SDGs. The authors also outline an action agenda for science to provide the knowledge required for designing, implementing, and monitoring the SDG Transformations.

“The 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement have given the world an aspirational narrative and an actionable agenda to achieve a just, safe, and sustainable future for all within planetary boundaries. The six transformations provide an integrated and holistic framework for action that reduces the complexity, yet encompasses the 17 SDGs, their 169 targets, and the Paris Agreement. They provide a new approach to shift from incremental to transformational change; to identify synergies using sustainable development pathways; formulate actionable roadmaps; and a focus on inter-relationships to uncover multiple benefits and synergies,” explains study co-author Nebojsa Nakicenovic, executive director of The World in 2050 (TWI2050) research initiative at IIASA.

In their paper the researchers considered which key interventions would be necessary to achieve the SDG outcomes and how their implementation might be organized into a limited set of six transformations namely education, gender, and inequality; health, wellbeing, and demography; energy decarbonization and sustainable industry; sustainable food, land, water, and oceans; sustainable cities and communities; and digital revolution for sustainable development. To simplify the discussion of interlinkages between interventions and SDGs, the authors further identified intermediate outputs generated by combinations of interventions, which in turn contribute to the achievement of each SDG. Each SDG transformation describes a major change in societal structure (economic, political, technological, and social) to achieve long-term sustainable development, while also each contributing to multiple SDGs. Excluding any of them would make it virtually impossible to achieve the SDGs.

Pursuing the six transformations will require deep, deliberate, long-term structural changes in resource use, infrastructure, institutions, technologies, and social relations, which have to happen in a relatively short time window. Previous societal transformations, like industrialization in 19th century Europe, were initiated by technological changes like the steam engine and were largely undirected, while 20th century technologies like semiconductors, the Internet and Global Positioning Systems, were promoted through directed innovation to meet military aims. The authors emphasize that it is crucial that SDG transformations are formally directed in order to meet time-bound, quantitative targets, such as net-zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

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Elon Musk

Musk The Technocrat: ‘China Is The Future’

Elon Musk is the consummate Technocrat of our age, whose grandfather headed the entire Technocracy, Inc. movement in Canada during the 1930s and 40s. He now joins other Big Tech billionaires to declare the ‘China is the future.’ ⁃ TN Editor

Tesla CEO Elon Musk commented that “China is the future” at the 2019 World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai on Thursday.
Speaking with Alibaba Group founder Jack Ma at the 2019 World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai this week, Tesla CEO and SpaceX founder Elon Musk discussed the opening of Tesla’s Shanghai Gigfactory, calling progress in the country “mind-blowing.”

Musk stated during the conference:

I spend a lot of my time on sustainable energy with tesla with you know electric cars and solar and batteries and that kind of thing and I’m really excited to be here in Shanghai for the Shanghai Gigafactory which is I think that Tesla china team has done an amazing job on. It is really mind-blowing like I’m just astounded by how good the job is and how much progress has been made and I think it’s a good story for the world and to say like look how much progress you can make in China.

This is extremely impressive like my hat is off you know you guys rock so I’ve never seen anything but so fast in my life before. To be totally frank I’ve seen some crazy things so you know I think it’s like I really think China is the future.




The Wrenching Chinese-ification Of America

America has roughly 12 months to sort out its desired future as either a Constitutional Republic or a Chinese-style Technocracy. Currently, the tipping point is tilted toward Technocracy. ⁃ TN Editor

As brave Hong Kongers protest the totalitarian communist Chinese regime in the streets and at the airport of their city, the mood here in the West, even in the United States, seems to be going in the opposite direction.

I’m not just referring to the violent so-called anarchists of Antifa, who often turn out to be emotionally disturbed community college instructors behind their Guy Fawkes masks, but to the larger zeitgeist. From Big Tech to Hollywood to our media to our campuses to the campaign rhetoric of virtually every Democratic candidate, we are moving toward a homogenization of thought and action that is, well, Chinese communist in style and ultimately in content.

Chairman Mao said, “Let a hundred schools of thought contend,” knowing full well whose would prevail. We’re no longer even paying that kind of lip service. Some form of political correctness has dominated our major institutions for years with minimal pushback.

Except for the election of Donald Trump, which was considered a horrifying aberration by our elites. How could such a vulgarian rise to such power? (No matter that they themselves were equally, if not more, reprehensible, as the Epstein revelations demonstrate.)

Because Trump’s policies were often arguably good and sometimes even conventionally so, attacks on him concentrated on his personality. That was especially true because his very persona upended that unifying and totalitarian (what else?) impulse toward political correctness.

So an American Cultural Revolution—not that distant from the original Chinese one, except so far no dunce caps—has been put in place by those various elites of the Academic-Hollywood-Media Complex. Actually, it’s been in place for a long time; only now it is escalating and approaching a point of no return.

Writers and thinkers are ghettoized. Only approved Republican pundits are allowed space, at least for long, in mainstream newspapers or television shows. The arts have become almost entirely off-limits to the right. Conservative professors are an endangered species at our universities, if not already extinct.

That is why it is no accident that you see Democrat proposals on the 2020 campaign trail that could have been taken from Lenin’s playbook. They are just part of this metastasizing zeitgeist. That these ideas have failed over and over is of no consequence. They sound good.

Don’t look at China or the Soviet Union or Cambodia or Cuba or Venezuela or North Korea or the entire Eastern Bloc when it was communist, not to mention Angola, Mozambique, and Ethiopia plus many others that all flirted with socialism/communism uniformly to disastrous ends. Look at Denmark! And please ignore that that extremely homogeneous country has a tiny population roughly half the size Los Angeles County’s and that they have been becoming less socialist themselves in their actual policies. We can use the land of Hans Christian Anderson as our model.

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