Iran Pledges Full Support of U.N.’s 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development

TN Note: There is an irony for a major oil producing nation to join the 2030 Agenda. Namely, the U.N. has pledged to obsolete fossil fuels altogether, which would eliminate Iran’s major source of foreign exchange.

Addressing a meeting of the UN General Assembly in New York on Wednesday, Gholamali Khoshroo commended all the parties involved in the process of finalization of a document entitled “Transforming our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, adopted at the UN two weeks ago.

He made it clear that Iran is committed to engaging constructively in the implementation of the Agenda at all levels, and voiced Tehran’s readiness to cooperate with the public and private sectors in this regard.

What follows is the full text of the Iranian diplomat’s speech:

Mr. President, distinguished colleagues, ladies and gentlemen;

Let me start by thanking the Secretary-General for his report on the work of the Organization, contained in document A/70/1.

Seventy years after the establishment of this organization, the vision of its founders, contained in the Charter of the United Nations, is still the beacon for our collective efforts towards achieving the goals of the United Nations. In the course of these seventy years, so many things have changed, but not the aspirations of “We, the peoples of the United Nations”, who want “to live together in peace with one another” and who have faith in “fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the Human person”. Today, more than any time before, we need to realize the purposes of this organization, and to respect and reaffirm its principles.

The world today is full of perils and hopes. The ideals of the Charter have never been so within reach, and at the same time, the challenges to them have never been so grave. Through our collective endeavors we have achieved a lot, but much more remains to be done.

The past year has been a typical example of the years in the history of this organization: a year of great achievements and big disappointments. On one hand the ambitious 2030 Development Agenda was finalized and the Joint Comprehensive Program of Action between Iran and the group of 5+1 was concluded; and on the other hand, the people of Palestine still live under occupation, many people in our region from Syria to Yemen are living under miserable conditions, and the brutalities of extremist groups like Daesh, Al-Nusra Front and Boko-haram continue.

Mr. President,

Let me briefly reflect on some of the main areas of the activity of the organization:

In the field of international peace and security, the successful conclusion of the negotiations between the Islamic Republic of Iran and the P5+1 countries and the EU, resulting in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and endorsed by the Security Council, proved that with seriousness, good faith and a win-win mindset, diplomacy can unlock even one of the most complex issues. During the course of negotiations, we showed that there should be nothing on the table other than logic, respect, the power of reasoning mutual interests.

We believe this deal not only transforms the dynamics of interaction between my country and the international community, but also has important positive ramifications for the entire region, and can help facilitate more cooperation in various fields, from security to development to environment issues. The Islamic Republic of Iran is consistent and sincere its call for forming a regional platform for dialogue in our region in the Middle East is imperative .This Regional dialogue ought to be carried out based on common goals and principles , as enshrined in the Charter, namely respecting the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all countries , to refrain from intervening in other countries’ domestic affairs, settlement of disputes peacefully, prevent the threat or use of force, strive for peace and stability, and achieve progress and prosperity for all.

Mr. president,

The Islamic Republic of Iran underlines the imperative of total elimination of nuclear weapons, as a requirement for international security and an obligation under the NPT, which is long overdue. We regret that as a result of the opposition by a small minority, the 2015 NPT Review Conference could not achieve its objectives.

Possession of nuclear weapons by the Israeli regime, which is the result of application of double standards by certain nuclear weapon states, continues to pose a serious threat to the peace and security of the Middle East. Aggression, occupation, committing war crimes and crimes against humanity are characteristics of a regime, which is at the same time armed with nuclear weapons and, thus, poses the biggest threat to the security of our region.

Mr. President,

We are grateful to Member States for their support, enabling the Assembly to adopt by consensus resolution A/68/127 titled “A World against Violence and Violent Extremism” (short for “WAVE”), which had been initiated by  President Hassan Rouhani of the Islamic Republic of Iran in 2013. As the current situation and escalation of violent extremism and terrorism in our region testifies to the pertinence of this resolution and the idea behind it, we need to revisit this resolution during this session of the Assembly. In this regard, we earnestly await the draft Comprehensive Plan of Action on Combating Violent Extremism that the Secretary-General is to present to the Assembly in coming months.

Mr. President,

We believe the issue of development should always have a high place in the agenda of this organization. In this regard, let me commend all those involved in the process to finalize the outcome document entitled “Transforming our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” that our leaders adopted two weeks ago in this august body.

As the agenda is adopted, our undertakings begin. The challenges ahead of us in this regard should be met collectively in a resolute and coordinated manner, through the United Nations System. Implementing the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals demands for more inclusive and non-discriminatory provisions, particularly regarding the finance and transfer of technology and associated know-how for moving towards a truly global partnership.

The Islamic Republic of Iran is committed to engaging constructively in the implementation of the Agenda at all levels, and in this regard, we welcome cooperation with the public and private sectors.

Mr. President,

The situation in our region shows that how our challenges in this globalized world are interconnected and mutually reinforcing. Our region is not only facing dire climate conditions, due to climate change, but it is also grappling with the scourge of terrorism and violent extremism. While terrorists damage the environment, they also push the sustainable development out of the agenda of countries, forcing them to spend their national resources on fighting insecurity. We are extremely concerned about the situation in parts of the region, especially Syria, Yemen and Libya, which has inflicted untold misery to the people and has enabled the extremists to continue their savagery. The UN system should assume a more active role and do whatever in its power to find peaceful solutions to these situations and to end these tragedies.

Mr. President,

Before conclusion, let me reiterate the relevance of the principles based on which this organization was founded. Sovereign equality of all Member States, peaceful settlement of international disputes and refraining from threat or use of force in international relations are cornerstones upon which this organization is built and continue to function.

The Islamic Republic of Iran, reiterating its unwavering support to the work of the United Nations based on its Charter, is ready to engage with all Member States to further the UN goals, and collectively tackle the challenges the humanity faces as a whole.

I thank you, Mr. President.




It’s 1992 All Over Again: Agenda 2030 Threatens Our Way of Life

If it were possible to have a time machine traveling back to 1992 to visit the United Nation’s “Earth Summit” in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, we would repeatedly hear the phrase “Sustainable Living” drilled into the minds of the 178 nations and state officials that attended, including President George H. Bush. The purpose of the “Earth Summit” was to warn World leaders that the Earth could no longer sustain the consumptive appetite of the United States of America. The solution was a plan for “Sustainable Development” that would be implemented throughout the World.

George H. Bush not only bought into the fear-factor rhetoric, but also praised the Earth Summit, that soon became known as U.N. Agenda 21. Thereafter our government partnered with the U.N. and began a quiet, carefully crafted plan to implement this U.N. plan into numerous agencies of our government in all states, and thus began what has become the most intrusive agenda in our history. Governing agencies, such as the EPA, began covertly injecting new laws and regulations into our lives, making changes that affect every citizen.

Today, twenty-three years later, Agenda 21 mandates are firmly entrenched and its tentacles can be seen within all levels of government.  Agenda 21 has even been inserted into most classrooms throughout America, largely due to liberal college professors and the controversial Common Core curriculum in grades K through 12.

Agenda 2030 Supersedes Agenda 21

Promoters of Agenda 21 seem to have had success, as we see facets of influence in all our lives.  But apparently those who strongly support and sponsor Agenda 21 had hoped for better results, disappointment becoming apparent when the United Nations arranged a massive new gathering of members for the purpose of rebooting Agenda 21.  On September 25 – 27, 2015, thousands of leaders from all over the World met in New York City to present a new fifteen-year plan entitled “Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.”  In spite of the name change, Agenda 2030 has basically the same plan and goals of Agenda 21. It only going deeper with its intentions to change the planet to United Nations’ specifications.  It’s Agenda 21 on steroids!

While Agenda 21 focused mainly on the environment, Agenda 2030 encompasses far more and is touted to be the “new universal agenda” for humanity.  It professes to be an altruistic plan that will benefit future generations. The reality, however, is that U.N. Agenda 2030 will rob individuals of most every freedom through its imposed mandates.

American citizens need to wake up to the fact that their American sovereignty is being challenged by the United Nations. Liberties have been lost since our government bought into U.N. Agenda 21 in 1992. The adoption of Agenda 2030 by U.N. world members on Friday, Sept. 26, will bring further erosion of liberties Americans hold dear.  The influential power brokers behind this agenda will attempt to persuade us that their plan is necessary to save the planet.  Be warned, the end result will be that the planet will be governed much like that of North Korea.  Every aspect of our lives will be dictated by those in power over us.

One-World Government to Save the Earth, Eliminate Poverty, and Promote Equality

Why are our leaders supporting these U.N. Agendas?  Consider that there are those who will profit by them.  They will finance advertisements promoting their plans, as was reported by Fox.com in May of this year.   Citizens have already been inundated with warnings of Climate Change which demand radical lifestyles essential to save the Earth, such as high-rise apartment living, rather than individual homes. The media gives the U.N. Agenda enormous publicity, but rarely prints information from leading scientists that dispute the claims.

Be forewarned, the promoters of U.N. Agenda 2030 will soon release subtle, very clever advertisements that will attempt to form or reform our thinking on the key issues of Agenda 2030. The ads will be designed to manipulate our thinking and opinions.  We will hear of plans to end poverty around the World and create universal peace.  U.N. leaders hope that you will be lured into handing over all your rights and freedoms for the betterment of everyone, so we are no longer bound by our time- honored Constitution.

For those Americans who love their country, this is a wake-up call.  U.N. Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, dreams of a world of peace and dignity for all, but the reality is far from this seemingly altruistic ideal.  We must sound the alarm that Agenda 2030 guarantees a future in which individual freedom is forfeited to an all-powerful One-World government controlled by tyrannical mandates.  We must deter those who are trying to change our amazing government that has allowed the United States to grow, prosper, and become the envy of the World.  To accomplish this we must be vigilant to stop the planned changes happening at every level of government.

Plan of Action to Create a “New World Order”

Judi McLeod’s September 26, 2015 article explains the subject in more detail:

Not unlike Agenda 21, the new fifteen-year 2030 U.N. plan sets forth details of how the U.N. intends to enforce its agenda, such as “All countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, will implement this plan.”  The preamble goes on to say:

“We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path.  As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind.”

Certainly we are not so naive as to think everyone would be willing to make the sacrifices demanded of this Agenda.  That is especially true when there is no proof that the pledges and promises can be accomplished.  Human nature cannot be changed by a United Nations’ agenda, suggesting the possibility of forceful change which might look more like the tactics that Stalin, Hitler, and other dictators used to force people into compliance.

The U.N. won’t openly come out to proclaim a New World Order but instead refers to “Sustainable Development” because that term sounds far less threatening. Patrick Wood, an economist and author of “Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation,” writes:

“It is clear the U.N. and its supporters see sustainable development as more than just the way to a cleaner environment. They see it as the vehicle for creating a long-sought new international economic order or “New World Order.”

Wood’s new book traces the modern technocracy movement to Zbigniew Brzezinski, David Rockefeller; and the Trilateral Commission in the early 1970s. “The environment is a perfect vehicle for the elite to use to accomplish their real agenda, because just about every possible form of human activity affects the environment in some way.  Ultimately, they hope to centrally plan and strictly regulate virtually everything that we do, and we will be told that it is necessary to “save the planet”.

Pope Buys Into U.N. Agenda 2030

It appears even Pope Francis has been influenced by those who are selling Agenda 2030, prompting him to softly, lovingly embrace the U.N. rhetoric about climate change, as well as welcoming immigrants. Such goals sound wonderful and desirable, but practical people also understand the negative and possible disastrous results. The selfish, foolish, ambitious and despicably evil will always be among us, and they are often successful in finding ways to exploit good intentions.  How much will the Pope’s words influence the many millions of Catholics throughout the world? 

17-Point 2030 Agenda Essential for “Utopia”

Everyone should be aware of the seventeen point U.N. blue-print that elitists claim is necessary for their “utopia”. The same deceptions will be used that have been sold to people for thousands of years, as ascribed to by Paul McGuire, the co-author of a new book entitled “The Babylon Code: Solving the Bible’s Greatest End-Times Mystery“:

“Deep inside every man and woman is the longing for a far better world, a world without war, disease, death, and pain. Our present world is a cruel world in which every life ends in death. From the beginning of time mankind has sought to use science and technology to create a perfect world, what some would call Utopia or Paradise. As the human race began to organize itself, a scientific or technocratic elite rose to power by promising the masses that they could build this perfect world. Ancient Babylon represented the first historical attempt to build paradise on earth.”

Mike Adams states in his article, “The United Nations 2030 Agenda Decoded”, that the U.N. plan is a blueprint for the global enslavement of humanity under the boot of corporate interests. The U.N. 2030 Agenda document sets forth nothing less than a global government takeover of every nation across the planet.  As Adams writes:

“The ‘goals’ of this document are nothing more than code words for a corporate-government fascist agenda that will imprison humanity in a devastating cycle of poverty while enriching the world’s most powerful globalist corporations like Monsanto and DuPont.  Nowhere does the U.N. document state [with its feel-good language] that “achieving human freedom” is one of its goals, neither does it explain how these goals are to be achieved.  Instead, the 17 points in the UN agenda are to be achieved through centralized government control and totalitarian mandates that are closely aligned with Communism.”

For the sake of brevity, only the first two of Adams’ seventeen 2030 agenda translations are noted below.  View all 17 here:

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere.

Translation: Put everyone on government welfare, food stamps, housing subsidies and handouts that make them dependent slaves to global government. Never allow people upward mobility to help themselves. Instead, teach mass victimization and obedience to a government that provides monthly “allowance” money for basic essentials like food and medicine. Label it “ending poverty.”

Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture.

Translation: Invade the entire planet with GMOs and Monsanto’s patented seeds while increasing the use of deadly herbicides under the false claim of “increased output” of food crops. Engineer genetically modified plants to boost specific vitamin chemicals while having no idea of the long-term consequences of genetic pollution or cross-species genetic experiments carried out openly in a fragile ecosystem.

Citizen Involvement Essential to Fight Encroachment of U.N. on American Sovereignty

America is the greatest country in the World, but we must elect bright, conservative, honest, and moral people to represent us if we want to keep it.  Our country should not allow the United Nations to make our laws or dictate our lives.

People are beginning to understand the need to stop electing “long time establishment candidates” who are more interested in protecting their money sources and political careers, than the people they swore to serve and protect.

There is no doubt that the 2016 election is one of the most important in our nation’s history.  We must encourage everyone we know to vote wisely by providing them with compelling facts to consider. Surely, Agenda 2030 needs to be exposed and each candidate asked to explain his or her opinion on this U.N. infringement on American sovereignty.

Read original story here…




Al Gore Seeks To Make World Leaders “Accountable” for Climate Change

TN Note: Al Gore is the poster child for Climate Change on planet Earth. He is also a former member of the elitist Trilateral Commission, who collectively have implemented their “New International Economic Order” as Sustainable Development through the United Nations. However, Sustainable Development is little more than warmed-over Technocracy from the 1930s. It is a resource-based economic system where all production and consumption is controlled by a scientific elite. For a full discussion of Technocracy and Sustainable Development, please see Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation.

Al Gore’s Climate Reality Project tries lighting a fire under world leaders in this two-minute film directed by Hungry Man’s Richard Bullock.

Shot in 13 countries, the video features environmental activists and average folks of all sorts, as well as Gore, Edward Norton and Sir Richard Branson. Each person stands or sits center-frame, reciting lines from the script while looking directly into the camera.

“I decided to try and create moving stills so that each frame was as beautiful and impactful as possible,” Bullock tells AdFreak. “I chose people and places which are experiencing climate change right now or involved in positive changes. This meant we visited deserts, coral reefs, high mountain glaciers and deforested areas.”

Though he employs a familiar visual technique, it’s effective at unifying the message and driving home the point that climate change affects everyone, regardless of age, race, geographic location or economic standing.

“Dear world leaders, we all know that the climate crisis is here. We can see it all around us,” the speakers begin. “We would do something about it. In fact, some of us already are.” They describe the steps they’re taking, and challenge those in power to follow their lead.

“Actually, we have some demands. We demand that you cooperate with one another. We demand that you send a message to polluters. Stop using fossil fuels. Now is the time, the time for you to act.”

The appeal strikes just the right tone, firm but respectful. Owing to their own efforts to improve the climate situation, the speakers can convincingly claim the moral authority to request action from their leaders. “The indigenous people we met had so many smart things to say about management of the planet,” says Bullock. “I just wish there were more of them involved in decisions about industry and carbon emissions and not just the men in suits with flags on their cars.”

The PSA appears ahead of COP21, the United Nations Climate Change conference in Paris next month, and urges viewers to add their voices to the cause by signing a petition on the Climate Reality site. It does well by trying to rally support among those already in step with the CRP’s position.

Still, even if a billion people sign a petition, would it matter to world leaders beholden to special interests and intent on following energy policies for reasons of their own?

“Well, I would hope that at least as a leader you might understand that there is an inherent responsibility to your fellow man when accepting your role,” says Bullock. “Hopefully the film helps to remind them of that before they hit the room to make the big calls in Paris.”

When it comes to effecting meaningful change, despite the best intentions and skillful communications, it also begs wondering if the CRP is really getting any warmer in achieving its goals.

“Will our film make a difference? Maybe not,” Bullock says. “But if it’s part of a weight or landslide of requests from people that build pressure on world leaders, then I am happy to throw our symbolic straw on the camel’s back.”

Read full story here…




Trans-Pacific Partnership: Enforcement for UN 2030 Agenda

Negotiations have been completed on the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), establishing comprehensive regulations across 12 Pacific Rim nations, an area representing 40 percent of the global economy.

Since President Obama achieved Fast Track Authority from Congress earlier this year, the next step toward enactment is submission of the TPP document for a straight up-or-down vote with no amendments or other changes permitted. In the meantime, the actual TPP text will be made public for a period of 60 days.

Public and Congressional debate promises to be the most contentious in modern times, far surpassing the choleric that preceded the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) under President Bill Clinton in 1994.

However, one aspect of TPP that is already being ignored is its tight synchronization with the United Nations’ recent enactment of its 2030 Agenda to implement Sustainable Development on a global scale. This will be further enhanced by the upcoming completion of the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) that is still under negotiation.

The current U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) and lead TPP architect is Michael Froman. The USTR is a member of the President’s Cabinet and as such, is Obama’s first and last authority on matters of international trade. On the USTR’s official blog, Tradewinds, Froman states,

“Trade agreements are a vital tool for combatting these global [environmental] threats. Two decades ago, environmental provisions under NAFTA were relegated to a side agreement, with only a single enforceable obligation to ‘effectively enforce your own environmental laws.’  In contrast, our most recent trade agreements contain extensive, enforceable environmental commitments. These commitments are subject to the same dispute settlement procedures as other commercial obligations, including recourse to trade sanctions in the event of a violation.” [Emphasis added]

The business of enforceable environmental commitments is further reiterated on the blog: “Enforceable commitments to protect the environment, coupled with targeted technical assistance and capacity building, can result in important environmental progress on the ground.”

My point is this: The United Nations conned the world into thinking that Agenda 21 and now its 2030 Agenda are somehow voluntary for implementation. In fact, Agenda 21 critics have been consistently lambasted with the rebuttal that nothing has ever been forced down anyone’s throat on a local, regional or national level – it’s just a voluntary program.

Hogwash. Such critics just haven’t been following the bouncing ball. Whatever may be couched as voluntary by the U.N. is fully enforceable by Trade Agreements.

While NAFTA and CAFTA (Central American Free Trade Agreement) were relatively light on environmentalism, the TPP majors in it. In fact, it is the most comprehensive statement on environmental regulations, enforcement and penalties in the history of all U.S. agreements and treaties.

We should not be surprised at this. On May 6, 2009 President Obama stated at the Proclamation of World Trade Week, “The United States and our trading partners stand to gain when trade is open, transparent, rules-based, and fair, showing respect for labor and environmental standards.” [Emphasis added]

Indeed. The debate will now rage over whether the TPP is open, transparent and fair, but let’s not forget that it also intends to be become a major enforcement tool for the United Nations implementation of its 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development throughout the world.

And No, it is not voluntary. Whoever would dare to focus on the U.N.’s velvet hammer of volunteerism will soon get clobbered by the iron anvil of global trade regulations and their harsh system of enforcement. Ignore that at your own risk.

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Patrick Wood is an author and lecturer on elite globalization policies since the late 1970s. He is co-author with the late Antony C. Sutton of Trilaterals Over Washington, Volumes I and II. His latest book, Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation, focuses on the role of science and technology in the quest for global domination, and the elite who are perpetrating it. It is also available on Amazon.com.

Please attribute this article to Patrick Wood at www.Technocracy.News




Obama Puts U.S. On ‘Fast Track’ to World Government

The U.N. document approved Sunday in New York, “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” includes in its preamble the call for a “new universal agenda” for all of humanity.

But one big question looms.

How does such an ambitious plan get implemented?

The plan bypasses Congress and the legislatures of the world’s other 193 nations. Yet, the heads of state agreed to work toward implementation, largely through secret trade deals and backroom bureaucratic rule-making, experts told WND.

Very few members of Congress have likely even read the U.N. document that Obama has agreed to implement, says one expert in globalism.

“The only thing they are lacking right now is a sufficient crisis big enough to win enthusiastic public support in America and other nations in the world for full-on global governance,” says Paul McGuire, a Fox News and History Channel contributor and co-author of the new release, “Babylon Code: Solving the Bible’s Greatest End Time Mystery.”

The U.N. document focuses on ending poverty and gender inequality, combating climate change and opening up borders to migrants and refugees.

“But, remember, the elite who are behind this are experts at manufactured crisis and their motto is ordo ab chao, which means ‘order out of chaos.’ This was a term coined by the Masonic leader Albert Pike,” McGuire told WND. “The new global order will be birthed by either a global financial crisis, the prospect of World War III involving Islam, Russia, Ukraine, NATO, Iran, Syria and Israel and a manufactured climate-change crisis.”

To address these crises, world leaders at the U.N. put their stamp of approval on a 15-year plan, the so-called 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development — a proposal some observers believe could be the first step toward the global superstate and cashless society predicted by biblical prophets.

“The real agenda of the globalist elite through all these ‘sustainable development’ and ‘social justice’ programs are to create a new global state,” says McGuire.

His book, co-authored with journalist Troy Anderson, takes an investigative approach to examining end-times prophecies and the current state of the world in the epic battle between good and evil.

“We read in the book of Revelation that in the last days Babylon will return as a ‘born-again’ world government, religion and economic system. What is happening now with the United Nations is Babylon rising again before our very eyes.”

Cliff Kincaid, director of the Accuracy in Media Center for Investigative Journalism, also has his eye on Pope Francis and the Vatican.

While the media paid great attention to the pope kissing babies and hugging adoring Americans, it gave little if any coverage to the real story of his visit, which was to endorse the U.N.’s march toward a new international order under the guise of “sustainable development,” Kincaid says in a recent article for AIM.

This agenda promises to radically affect the individual lives of ordinary Americans, yet they are being kept in the dark about its details.

The stated purpose of the U.N. “high panel’s” report is to “transform economies through sustainable development.”

The only American on this panel was John Podesta, former top climate-change adviser for Obama and now chairman for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

Podesta is also a member in the elitist Trilateral Commission, founded in 1973 by David Rockefeller and Zbigniew Brzezinski, and founder of the George Soros-funded Center for American Progress.

“In addition to destroying the American system, the recommendations of this so-called high-level body, especially on the matter of ‘climate action,’ could also have a dramatic impact on the lives of people around the world, including the poor, who need access to energy and real economic development to escape poverty,” Kincaid writes.

According to Patrick Wood, author of “Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation,” the whole “sustainable development” meme is a ploy to replace capitalism and free enterprise with a global socialist system based on resource allocation and energy usage rather than on supply and demand and free-market activity.

Wood said the proposed “transformation” of the world’s current economic system “for a completely untried and untested one” is “dangerously absurd” and could make life worse for the people that the U.N. and Roman Catholic Church are supposed to help.

“Any honest economist would instantly balk at such Pollyannaish promises of utopia, and the American public should do so as well,” Wood told Kincaid. “The fact is that these wild promises of prosperity for all are merely the candy coating to deceive the world into going along with its own economic destruction.”

Read complete story here…




The Official UN Sustainable Development Goals For 2030 Agenda

These are the official 17 goals (simply referred to as the SDGs) for the new 2030 Agenda that was universally adopted by the nations of the world at the United Nations plenary meeting in New York on September 25, 2015.

Sustainable Development Goals (1/2016 – 12/2030)

Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all

Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls

Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all

Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*

Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels

Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development

* Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating
the global response to climate change.

The asterisk on Goal 13 reminds the participants that it is the UN Framework on Climate Change (Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary) who will be in charge of “negotiating” and hence, enforcement.

These SDGs replace but do not invalidate the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that were developed by the United Nations Millennium Summit in September 2000. In fact, the 2030 Agenda document itself makes this clear:

Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda. They seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what they did not achieve. [Emphasis added]

For comparison’s sake, here are the original nine MDGs that expire on December 31, 2015.

Millennium Development Goals (9/2000 – 12/2015)

Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Hunger and Poverty

Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education

Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women

Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality

Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health

Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases

Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability

Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development

The expanded SDGs will simply provide for more aggressive implementation of the Sustainable Development agenda on a global basis.

Nor do the SDGs replace Agenda 21 that was produced by the first Earth Summit held in 1992 in Rio. In fact, the SDGs are more inclusive of Agenda 21 than were the original MDGs.  The 2030 Agenda clearly states, “We reaffirm all the principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, including, inter alia, the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities.”




White House: 2030 Agenda and U.S. Global Development Policy

TN Note: This is President Obama’s official response in parallel to the 2030 Agenda document that was accepted by world leaders at the United Nations on Sept. 25-29, 2015. It was released on Whitehouse.gov

President Obama’s Commitment to Global Development 

2015 is a pivotal year for global development. World leaders gathered in New York today to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (“2030 Agenda”). The adoption of the 2030 Agenda, which sets out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years, captures the hopes and ambitions of people around the globe for meaningful change and progress, including here in the United States. Through the adoption of this historic framework, the United States joins with countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind by ending extreme poverty and prioritizing policies and investments that have long-term, transformative impact and are sustainable. Under the Obama Administration, the United States has committed and helped mobilize more than $100 billion in new funding from other donors and the private sector to fight poverty in the areas of health, food security, and energy. In the United States, the adoption of the 2030 Agenda coincides with a growing bipartisan consensus on the importance of global development, and direct philanthropic contributions from the American people, who annually provide substantial support for emergency relief and development around the world.

This is a time for optimism and celebration of the remarkable gains to which the MDGs have contributed worldwide, including: decreasing the global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day by more than two-thirds since 1990; more than halving the rate of child mortality; and reaching gender parity in primary-school enrollment. At the same time, the 2030 Agenda builds on the MDGs, reflecting the lessons the world has learned since 2000 about what works, including the need for more transparent, accountable and inclusive approaches to development, to focus on transformative priorities that have sustainable impact, and to leverage the full array of resources for development. The 2030 Agenda, as the successor framework to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), follows the adoption in July of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (Addis Agenda), a roadmap to help countries identify, attract and access diverse sources of development finance to realize the 2030 Agenda. It also paves the way for a global agreement on climate change due to be concluded at the 21st Conference of the Parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris in December.

This pivotal juncture provides an important opportunity to take stock of how far U.S. development policy has come and the many U.S. initiatives that will be key to achieving these goals. Building on more than a half century of global leadership, including the creation of the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) and the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) under President George W. Bush, President Obama released the first U.S. Global Development Policy in 2010. For the first time, global development was elevated as a core pillar of American power, and recognized as a strategic, economic, and moral imperative for the United States. The President laid out a vision that places a premium on many of the principles and objectives reflected in the 2030 Agenda, including: broad-based economic growth; democratic governance; game-changing innovations; leveraging international partnerships and the vast array of development financing; and building sustainable systems to meet basic human needs.

Today, U.S. global development investments are now better targeted to achieve sustainable development outcomes and impact; to leverage critical partnerships with other donors, the private sector and nongovernmental partners; and to more effectively use the power of technology and innovation to lift the most vulnerable out of poverty. The United States is exercising global leadership that will be pivotal to achieving the 2030 Agenda in the following areas:

  • Global health and Global Health Security Agenda: Under the Obama Administration, U.S. contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) have totaled $7.2 billion, and we have leveraged more than $13.2 billion in contributions to the Global Fund from other sources. Through these investments the United States continues to lead the world in our investments in global health to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic and contribute to an AIDS free generation, fight malaria and TB, reduce maternal and child deaths, and strengthen health systems. Today, the President announced ambitious new targets for PEPFAR, including a U.S. goal to reach a total of 11.4 million people with HIV/AIDS treatment by the end of 2016, and 12.9 million people by the end of 2017; achieve a 25% decrease in HIV incidence among adolescent girls and young women (aged 15-24) within the highest burden geographic areas of 10 sub-Saharan African countries jointly with partners by the end of 2016; and achieve a 40% decrease in HIV incidence among adolescent girls and young women (aged 15-24) within these areas by the end of 2017. Although our work is far from done—the United States, along with partners from around the world, has made significant progress in the fight against Ebola in West Africa.  We need to stay vigilant in our efforts to counter biological threats and to prevent future outbreaks from becoming epidemics.  That is why we have made a commitment to assist at least 30 countries to achieve the targets of the Global Health Security Agenda to build national, regional, and international capability to prevent, detect and respond to infectious disease threats, whether naturally occurring, accidental or intentional. The G-7 Leaders have taken a decision to match this commitment by collectively offering to assist at least 60 countries.
  • Food security and nutrition: Following the 2009 G8 L’Aquila Summit and President Obama’s call for global leaders to do more to address food insecurity, the United States led a campaign that mobilized $22 billion in assistance for agriculture, and today food security and nutrition are at the top of the global agenda after decades of decline in investment.  Through the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, the United States and its partners have mobilized $10 billion in private sector commitments from more than 200 international and African companies, of which $1.8 billion has already been invested in Africa’s agricultural sector. The number of hungry people in the world – 795 million – has dropped by 100 million over the past decade, thanks in no small part to these and other coordinated international efforts. Recognizing that investing in agricultural development and improved nutrition can have transformative impact in reducing hunger and extreme poverty, President Obama announced the Feed the Future initiative in 2010, building on previous U.S. commitments, including the Initiative to End Hunger in Africa. Through Feed the Future, the Administration is working closely with our country partners to support inclusive economic growth through development of the agriculture sector. U.S. efforts have resulted in increased yields, higher incomes, improved nutrition and more dynamic economies. Complementing our bilateral efforts, the United States launched together with other donors the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program (GAFSP), an innovative multi-donor trust fund that has allocated $1.4 billion to date to 25 low-income countries to help boost agricultural productivity. Building on the momentum created by Feed the Future, the United States is also promoting inclusive, collective global action to increase food security. With other G-7 countries and African leaders, President Obama launched the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in 2012 to promote sustainability through increased and more responsible private-sector investment in African agriculture.
  • Power Africa: Since its launch, when the United States committed $7 billion, Power Africa has leveraged nearly $43 billion in external commitments, including more than $31 billion in private-sector commitments alone.  Through Power Africa, the United States is working together with a range of partners to accelerate private-sector energy transactions, by leveraging the assistance, financing, commercial and diplomatic tools of the U.S. Government, as well as by leveraging the tools and expertise of our bilateral and multilateral partners, including the African Development Bank, the World Bank Group, the Swedish Government, the European Union, and more than 100 private-sector partners.  The dramatic investments the United States and these partners are generating will change people’s lives for the better.
  • Ending extreme poverty: The development policy of and major development initiatives led by the United States are built on the premise that fighting extreme poverty and fostering sustained and inclusive growth, equal access to opportunity and open and fair governance serve one and the same mission.  To further sharpen that mission, USAID released earlier this week its new Vision for Ending Extreme Poverty, which sets forth USAID’s definition of extreme poverty, its understanding of what has driven progress, analysis of pertinent trends and challenges, and a strategic framework for USAID’s ongoing commitment to this mission.
  • Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women and Girls:Twenty years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, and the affirmation that “women’s rights are human rights,” women and girls around the world continue to face profound inequalities in every area of life, in every country, and in both public and private spheres.  The United States is deeply committed to promoting gender equality and advancing the rights of women and girls around the world.
  • Climate Change and Resilience: The United States is committed to facilitating climate resilient, low emissions economic growth in developing countries, including through the President’s Global Climate Change Initiative. Recognizing that climate change poses a systemic risk, President Obama signed an Executive Order that requires federal agencies to take climate resilience into account across U.S. international development programs, helping to ensure that our foreign assistance fosters a low-carbon future and promotes sustainable and resilient societies over the coming decades. This Administration has worked to make our climate financing efficient, effective, innovative, and focused on achieving measurable results based on country-owned plans, while mobilizing private investment. These efforts complement U.S. investments in other areas; last year, for example, the United States and other global leaders launched the Global Alliance for Climate-Smart Agriculture (GACSA), a multi-stakeholder coalition dedicated to addressing the challenges of promoting food security and supporting agricultural growth in the context of climate change.
  • Education: The United States has contributed $127 million to theGlobal Partnership for Education (GPE), which, along with other donor contributions, has helped put 22.5 million more children in school.  In March 2015, First Lady Michelle Obama announced Let Girls Learn, a new initiative that will build on investments the United States has made and successes achieved in global primary-school education, and expand them to help adolescent girls complete their education and pursue their broader aspirations.
  • Promoting open government: In 2011, President Obama joined with seven other heads of state to launch the Open Government Partnership (OGP), a global initiative to increase transparency, bolster citizen engagement, and harness new technologies to improve governance. Today, this partnership has grown from 8 to 66 nations that have made more than 2,000 commitments to improving governance for some 2 billion people worldwide. Today, the United States joined OGP Steering Committee members in signing a declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
  • Catalyzing private investment and other sources of financing:Across these initiatives and more broadly, this Administration is advancing a new model of development focused on using our development finance tools to mobilize private and other forms of capital for sustainable development and as a lever to spur transformation. In July, the United States joined with other development partners to launch the Addis Tax Initiative, a partnership to help developing countries better mobilize and effectively use their own domestic resources to achieve sustainable development. Under this Administration, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), the U.S. Government’s development finance institution, has supported more than $35 billion in private investment in developing and emerging markets.  The new projects that OPIC has supported since 2002, when the Monterrey Consensus was agreed, are expected to yield close to $82 billion in private investment. Since its establishment in 2004, the Millennium Challenge Corporation’s (MCC) $10 billion grant portfolio has leveraged nearly $5 billion in private-sector investment and more than $450 million in partner country contributions.
  • Spurring innovation: The Obama Administration has promoted new public- and private-sector efforts to harness cutting-edge technologies, including to accelerate research and scale innovations to support sustainable development. USAID’s Global Development Lab is bringing together diverse partners to identify, test and scale innovations to solve development challenges, and accelerate efforts to end extreme poverty. Through a partnership with other development agencies, USAID launched the Global Innovation Fund in 2014 to boost investments in novel solutions to development challenges. The United States is joining other countries and civil society partners in launching the Global Partnership on Sustainable Development Data, to accelerate the data revolution that will be essential for achieving and measuring progress on the sustainable development goals.
  • Mitigating and responding to conflict and disaster: As the human toll of the world’s humanitarian crises reached staggering heights, the United States remains the world’s largest humanitarian donor, having provided $6.5 billion in life-saving food, healthcare, water and shelter this year. Around the world the United States partners with non-governmental and faith-based groups in the response to these crises, and continues to exercise global leadership by issuing calls for the international community to do more to contribute to UN humanitarian appeals. The international community has a collective responsibility not only to help those in need, but to work together to address the root causes of poverty and conflict, to ensure that all people have access to economic opportunity. In addition to leading the world in terms of the generosity of our global humanitarian assistance and emergency response in times of disaster, we’re investing in vulnerable communities across the Sahel, the Horn of Africa, and South and Southeast Asia to help them build resilience to crises and conflicts and, eventually, reduce the need for costly emergency interventions.

The 2030 Agenda is ambitious, and there is much work to be done. The adoption of this new framework is just the beginning, and we must recognize that no government or country can deliver on the promise of this ambitious agenda single-handedly. It is incumbent upon all stakeholders – governments, the development community, faith-based organizations, research institutions, the private sector and ordinary citizens – to work together in partnership to contribute to a sustained global effort over the next 15 years, in order to deliver on the promise of this Agenda for our citizens.

See original document here…




Full Text of Obama’s 9/28 Speech to the United Nations

Mr. President, Mr. Secretary General, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen:  Seventy years after the founding of the United Nations, it is worth reflecting on what, together, the members of this body have helped to achieve.

Out of the ashes of the Second World War, having witnessed the unthinkable power of the atomic age, the United States has worked with many nations in this Assembly to prevent a third world war — by forging alliances with old adversaries; by supporting the steady emergence of strong democracies accountable to their people instead of any foreign power; and by building an international system that imposes a cost on those who choose conflict over cooperation, an order that recognizes the dignity and equal worth of all people.

That is the work of seven decades.  That is the ideal that this body, at its best, has pursued.  Of course, there have been too many times when, collectively, we have fallen short of these ideals.  Over seven decades, terrible conflicts have claimed untold victims.  But we have pressed forward, slowly, steadily, to make a system of international rules and norms that are better and stronger and more consistent.

It is this international order that has underwritten unparalleled advances in human liberty and prosperity.  It is this collective endeavor that’s brought about diplomatic cooperation between the world’s major powers, and buttressed a global economy that has lifted more than a billion people from poverty.  It is these international principles that helped constrain bigger countries from imposing our will on smaller ones, and advanced the emergence of democracy and development and individual liberty on every continent.

This progress is real.  It can be documented in lives saved, and agreements forged, and diseases conquered, and in mouths fed. And yet, we come together today knowing that the march of human progress never travels in a straight line, that our work is far from complete; that dangerous currents risk pulling us back into a darker, more disordered world.

Today, we see the collapse of strongmen and fragile states breeding conflict, and driving innocent men, women and children across borders on an *epoch epic scale.  Brutal networks of terror have stepped into the vacuum.  Technologies that empower individuals are now also exploited by those who spread disinformation, or suppress dissent, or radicalize our youth.  Global capital flows have powered growth and investment, but also increased risk of contagion, weakened the bargaining power of workers, and accelerated inequality.

How should we respond to these trends?  There are those who argue that the ideals enshrined in the U.N. charter are unachievable or out of date — a legacy of a postwar era not suited to our own.  Effectively, they argue for a return to the rules that applied for most of human history and that pre-date this institution: the belief that power is a zero-sum game; that might makes right; that strong states must impose their will on weaker ones; that the rights of individuals don’t matter; and that in a time of rapid change, order must be imposed by force.

On this basis, we see some major powers assert themselves in ways that contravene international law.  We see an erosion of the democratic principles and human rights that are fundamental to this institution’s mission; information is strictly controlled, the space for civil society restricted.  We’re told that such retrenchment is required to beat back disorder; that it’s the only way to stamp out terrorism, or prevent foreign meddling.  In accordance with this logic, we should support tyrants like Bashar al-Assad, who drops barrel bombs to massacre innocent children, because the alternative is surely worse.

The increasing skepticism of our international order can also be found in the most advanced democracies.  We see greater polarization, more frequent gridlock; movements on the far right, and sometimes the left, that insist on stopping the trade that binds our fates to other nations, calling for the building of walls to keep out immigrants.  Most ominously, we see the fears of ordinary people being exploited through appeals to sectarianism, or tribalism, or racism, or anti-Semitism; appeals to a glorious past before the body politic was infected by those who look different, or worship God differently; a politics of us versus them.

The United States is not immune from this.  Even as our economy is growing and our troops have largely returned from Iraq and Afghanistan, we see in our debates about America’s role in the world a notion of strength that is defined by opposition to old enemies, perceived adversaries, a rising China, or a resurgent Russia; a revolutionary Iran, or an Islam that is incompatible with peace.  We see an argument made that the only strength that matters for the United States is bellicose words and shows of military force; that cooperation and diplomacy will not work.

As President of the United States, I am mindful of the dangers that we face; they cross my desk every morning.  I lead the strongest military that the world has ever known, and I will never hesitate to protect my country or our allies, unilaterally and by force where necessary.

But I stand before you today believing in my core that we, the nations of the world, cannot return to the old ways of conflict and coercion.  We cannot look backwards.  We live in an integrated world — one in which we all have a stake in each other’s success.  We cannot turn those forces of integration.  No nation in this Assembly can insulate itself from the threat of terrorism, or the risk of financial contagion; the flow of migrants, or the danger of a warming planet.  The disorder we see is not driven solely by competition between nations or any single ideology.  And if we cannot work together more effectively, we will all suffer the consequences.  That is true for the United States, as well.

No matter how powerful our military, how strong our economy, we understand the United States cannot solve the world’s problems alone.  In Iraq, the United States learned the hard lesson that even hundreds of thousands of brave, effective troops, trillions of dollars from our Treasury, cannot by itself impose stability on a foreign land.  Unless we work with other nations under the mantle of international norms and principles and law that offer legitimacy to our efforts, we will not succeed.  And unless we work together to defeat the ideas that drive different communities in a country like Iraq into conflict, any order that our militaries can impose will be temporary.

Just as force alone cannot impose order internationally, I believe in my core that repression cannot forge the social cohesion for nations to succeed.  The history of the last two decades proves that in today’s world, dictatorships are unstable. The strongmen of today become the spark of revolution tomorrow.  You can jail your opponents, but you can’t imprison ideas.  You can try to control access to information, but you cannot turn a lie into truth.  It is not a conspiracy of U.S.-backed NGOs that expose corruption and raise the expectations of people around the globe; it’s technology, social media, and the irreducible desire of people everywhere to make their own choices about how they are governed.

Indeed, I believe that in today’s world, the measure of strength is no longer defined by the control of territory.   Lasting prosperity does not come solely from the ability to access and extract raw materials.  The strength of nations depends on the success of their people — their knowledge, their innovation, their imagination, their creativity, their drive, their opportunity — and that, in turn, depends upon individual rights and good governance and personal security.  Internal repression and foreign aggression are both symptoms of the failure to provide this foundation.

A politics and solidarity that depend on demonizing others, that draws on religious sectarianism or narrow tribalism or jingoism may at times look like strength in the moment, but over time its weakness will be exposed.  And history tells us that the dark forces unleashed by this type of politics surely makes all of us less secure.  Our world has been there before.  We gain nothing from going back.

Instead, I believe that we must go forward in pursuit of our ideals, not abandon them at this critical time.  We must give expression to our best hopes, not our deepest fears.  This institution was founded because men and women who came before us had the foresight to know that our nations are more secure when we uphold basic laws and basic norms, and pursue a path of cooperation over conflict.  And strong nations, above all, have a responsibility to uphold this international order.

Let me give you a concrete example.  After I took office, I made clear that one of the principal achievements of this body — the nuclear non-proliferation regime — was endangered by Iran’s violation of the NPT.  On that basis, the Security Council tightened sanctions on the Iranian government, and many nations joined us to enforce them.  Together, we showed that laws and agreements mean something.

But we also understood that the goal of sanctions was not simply to punish Iran.  Our objective was to test whether Iran could change course, accept constraints, and allow the world to verify that its nuclear program will be peaceful.  For two years, the United States and our partners — including Russia, including China — stuck together in complex negotiations.  The result is a lasting, comprehensive deal that prevents Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, while allowing it to access peaceful energy.  And if this deal is fully implemented, the prohibition on nuclear weapons is strengthened, a potential war is averted, our world is safer.  That is the strength of the international system when it works the way it should.

That same fidelity to international order guides our responses to other challenges around the world.  Consider Russia’s annexation of Crimea and further aggression in eastern Ukraine.  America has few economic interests in Ukraine.  We recognize the deep and complex history between Russia and Ukraine.  But we cannot stand by when the sovereignty and territorial integrity of a nation is flagrantly violated.  If that happens without consequence in Ukraine, it could happen to any nation gathered here today.  That’s the basis of the sanctions that the United States and our partners impose on Russia.  It’s not a desire to return to a Cold War.

Now, within Russia, state-controlled media may describe these events as an example of a resurgent Russia — a view shared, by the way, by a number of U.S. politicians and commentators who have always been deeply skeptical of Russia, and seem to be convinced a new Cold War is, in fact, upon us.  And yet, look at the results.  The Ukrainian people are more interested than ever in aligning with Europe instead of Russia. Sanctions have led to capital flight, a contracting economy, a fallen ruble, and the emigration of more educated Russians.

Imagine if, instead, Russia had engaged in true diplomacy, and worked with Ukraine and the international community to ensure its interests were protected.  That would be better for Ukraine, but also better for Russia, and better for the world — which is why we continue to press for this crisis to be resolved in a way that allows a sovereign and democratic Ukraine to determine its future and control its territory.  Not because we want to isolate Russia — we don’t — but because we want a strong Russia that’s invested in working with us to strengthen the international system as a whole.

Similarly, in the South China Sea, the United States makes no claim on territory there.  We don’t adjudicate claims.  But like every nation gathered here, we have an interest in upholding the basic principles of freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce, and in resolving disputes through international law, not the law of force.  So we will defend these principles, while encouraging China and other claimants to resolve their differences peacefully.

I say this, recognizing that diplomacy is hard; that the outcomes are sometimes unsatisfying; that it’s rarely politically popular.  But I believe that leaders of large nations, in particular, have an obligation to take these risks — precisely because we are strong enough to protect our interests if, and when, diplomacy fails.

I also believe that to move forward in this new era, we have to be strong enough to acknowledge when what you’re doing is not working.  For 50 years, the United States pursued a Cuba policy that failed to improve the lives of the Cuban people.  We changed that.  We continue to have differences with the Cuban government. We will continue to stand up for human rights.  But we address these issues through diplomatic relations, and increased commerce, and people-to-people ties.  As these contacts yield progress, I’m confident that our Congress will inevitably lift an embargo that should not be in place anymore.  (Applause.)  Change won’t come overnight to Cuba, but I’m confident that openness, not coercion, will support the reforms and better the life the Cuban people deserve, just as I believe that Cuba will find its success if it pursues cooperation with other nations.

Now, if it’s in the interest of major powers to uphold international standards, it is even more true for the rest of the community of nations.  Look around the world.  From Singapore to Colombia to Senegal, the facts shows that nations succeed when they pursue an inclusive peace and prosperity within their borders, and work cooperatively with countries beyond their borders.

That path is now available to a nation like Iran, which, as of this moment, continues to deploy violent proxies to advance its interests.  These efforts may appear to give Iran leverage in disputes with neighbors, but they fuel sectarian conflict that endangers the entire region, and isolates Iran from the promise of trade and commerce.  The Iranian people have a proud history, and are filled with extraordinary potential.  But chanting “Death to America” does not create jobs, or make Iran more secure.  If Iran chose a different path, that would be good for the security of the region, good for the Iranian people, and good for the world.

Of course, around the globe, we will continue to be confronted with nations who reject these lessons of history, places where civil strife, border disputes, and sectarian wars bring about terrorist enclaves and humanitarian disasters.  Where order has completely broken down, we must act, but we will be stronger when we act together.

In such efforts, the United States will always do our part. We will do so mindful of the lessons of the past — not just the lessons of Iraq, but also the example of Libya, where we joined an international coalition under a U.N. mandate to prevent a slaughter.  Even as we helped the Libyan people bring an end to the reign of a tyrant, our coalition could have and should have done more to fill a vacuum left behind.  We’re grateful to the United Nations for its efforts to forge a unity government.  We will help any legitimate Libyan government as it works to bring the country together.  But we also have to recognize that we must work more effectively in the future, as an international community, to build capacity for states that are in distress, before they collapse.

And that’s why we should celebrate the fact that later today the United States will join with more than 50 countries to enlist new capabilities — infantry, intelligence, helicopters, hospitals, and tens of thousands of troops — to strengthen United Nations peacekeeping.  (Applause.)  These new capabilities can prevent mass killing, and ensure that peace agreements are more than words on paper.  But we have to do it together.  Together, we must strengthen our collective capacity to establish security where order has broken down, and to support those who seek a just and lasting peace.

Nowhere is our commitment to international order more tested than in Syria.  When a dictator slaughters tens of thousands of his own people, that is not just a matter of one nation’s internal affairs — it breeds human suffering on an order of magnitude that affects us all.  Likewise, when a terrorist group beheads captives, slaughters the innocent and enslaves women, that’s not a single nation’s national security problem — that is an assault on all humanity.

I’ve said before and I will repeat:  There is no room for accommodating an apocalyptic cult like ISIL, and the United States makes no apologies for using our military, as part of a broad coalition, to go after them.  We do so with a determination to ensure that there will never be a safe haven for terrorists who carry out these crimes.  And we have demonstrated over more than a decade of relentless pursuit of al Qaeda, we will not be outlasted by extremists.

But while military power is necessary, it is not sufficient to resolve the situation in Syria.  Lasting stability can only take hold when the people of Syria forge an agreement to live together peacefully.  The United States is prepared to work with any nation, including Russia and Iran, to resolve the conflict. But we must recognize that there cannot be, after so much bloodshed, so much carnage, a return to the pre-war status quo.

Let’s remember how this started.  Assad reacted to peaceful protests by escalating repression and killing that, in turn, created the environment for the current strife.  And so Assad and his allies cannot simply pacify the broad majority of a population who have been brutalized by chemical weapons and indiscriminate bombing.  Yes, realism dictates that compromise will be required to end the fighting and ultimately stamp out ISIL.  But realism also requires a managed transition away from Assad and to a new leader, and an inclusive government that recognizes there must be an end to this chaos so that the Syrian people can begin to rebuild.

We know that ISIL — which emerged out of the chaos of Iraq and Syria — depends on perpetual war to survive.  But we also know that they gain adherents because of a poisonous ideology.  So part of our job, together, is to work to reject such extremism that infects too many of our young people.  Part of that effort must be a continued rejection by Muslims of those who distort Islam to preach intolerance and promote violence, and it must also a rejection by non-Muslims of the ignorance that equates Islam with terror.  (Applause.)

This work will take time.  There are no easy answers to Syria.  And there are no simple answers to the changes that are taking place in much of the Middle East and North Africa.  But so many families need help right now; they don’t have time.  And that’s why the United States is increasing the number of refugees who we welcome within our borders.  That’s why we will continue to be the largest donor of assistance to support those refugees. And today we are launching new efforts to ensure that our people and our businesses, our universities and our NGOs can help as well — because in the faces of suffering families, our nation of immigrants sees ourselves.

Of course, in the old ways of thinking, the plight of the powerless, the plight of refugees, the plight of the marginalized did not matter.  They were on the periphery of the world’s concerns.  Today, our concern for them is driven not just by conscience, but should also be drive by self-interest.  For helping people who have been pushed to the margins of our world is not mere charity, it is a matter of collective security.  And the purpose of this institution is not merely to avoid conflict, it is to galvanize the collective action that makes life better on this planet.

The commitments we’ve made to the Sustainable Development Goals speak to this truth.  I believe that capitalism has been the greatest creator of wealth and opportunity that the world has ever known.  But from big cities to rural villages around the world, we also know that prosperity is still cruelly out of reach for too many.  As His Holiness Pope Francis reminds us, we are stronger when we value the least among these, and see them as equal in dignity to ourselves and our sons and our daughters.

We can roll back preventable disease and end the scourge of HIV/AIDS.  We can stamp out pandemics that recognize no borders. That work may not be on television right now, but as we demonstrated in reversing the spread of Ebola, it can save more lives than anything else we can do.

Together, we can eradicate extreme poverty and erase barriers to opportunity.  But this requires a sustained commitment to our people — so farmers can feed more people; so entrepreneurs can start a business without paying a bribe; so young people have the skills they need to succeed in this modern, knowledge-based economy.

We can promote growth through trade that meets a higher standard.  And that’s what we’re doing through the Trans-Pacific Partnership — a trade agreement that encompasses nearly 40 percent of the global economy; an agreement that will open markets, while protecting the rights of workers and protecting the environment that enables development to be sustained.

We can roll back the pollution that we put in our skies, and help economies lift people out of poverty without condemning our children to the ravages of an ever-warming climate.  The same ingenuity that produced the Industrial Age and the Computer Age allows us to harness the potential of clean energy.  No country can escape the ravages of climate change.  And there is no stronger sign of leadership than putting future generations first.  The United States will work with every nation that is willing to do its part so that we can come together in Paris to decisively confront this challenge.

And finally, our vision for the future of this Assembly, my belief in moving forward rather than backwards, requires us to defend the democratic principles that allow societies to succeed. Let me start from a simple premise:  Catastrophes, like what we are seeing in Syria, do not take place in countries where there is genuine democracy and respect for the universal values this institution is supposed to defend.  (Applause.)

I recognize that democracy is going to take different forms in different parts of the world.  The very idea of a people governing themselves depends upon government giving expression to their unique culture, their unique history, their unique experiences.  But some universal truths are self-evident.  No person wants to be imprisoned for peaceful worship.  No woman should ever be abused with impunity, or a girl barred from going to school.  The freedom to peacefully petition those in power without fear of arbitrary laws — these are not ideas of one country or one culture.  They are fundamental to human progress. They are a cornerstone of this institution.

I realize that in many parts of the world there is a different view — a belief that strong leadership must tolerate no dissent.  I hear it not only from America’s adversaries, but privately at least I also hear it from some of our friends.  I disagree.  I believe a government that suppresses peaceful dissent is not showing strength; it is showing weakness and it is showing fear.  (Applause.)  History shows that regimes who fear their own people will eventually crumble, but strong institutions built on the consent of the governed endure long after any one individual is gone.

That’s why our strongest leaders — from George Washington to Nelson Mandela — have elevated the importance of building strong, democratic institutions over a thirst for perpetual power.  Leaders who amend constitutions to stay in office only acknowledge that they failed to build a successful country for their people — because none of us last forever.  It tells us that power is something they cling to for its own sake, rather than for the betterment of those they purport to serve.

I understand democracy is frustrating.  Democracy in the United States is certainly imperfect.  At times, it can even be dysfunctional.  But democracy — the constant struggle to extend rights to more of our people, to give more people a voice — is what allowed us to become the most powerful nation in the world. (Applause.)

It’s not simply a matter of principle; it’s not an abstraction.  Democracy — inclusive democracy — makes countries stronger.  When opposition parties can seek power peacefully through the ballot, a country draws upon new ideas.  When a free media can inform the public, corruption and abuse are exposed and can be rooted out.  When civil society thrives, communities can solve problems that governments cannot necessarily solve alone.  When immigrants are welcomed, countries are more productive and more vibrant.  When girls can go to school, and get a job, and pursue unlimited opportunity, that’s when a country realizes its full potential.  (Applause.)

That is what I believe is America’s greatest strength.  Not everybody in America agrees with me.  That’s part of democracy.  I believe that the fact that you can walk the streets of this city right now and pass churches and synagogues and temples and mosques, where people worship freely; the fact that our nation of immigrants mirrors the diversity of the world — you can find everybody from everywhere here in New York City — (applause) — the fact that, in this country, everybody can contribute, everybody can participate no matter who they are, or what they look like, or who they love — that’s what makes us strong.

And I believe that what is true for America is true for virtually all mature democracies.  And that is no accident.  We can be proud of our nations without defining ourselves in opposition to some other group.  We can be patriotic without demonizing someone else.  We can cherish our own identities — our religion, our ethnicity, our traditions — without putting others down.  Our systems are premised on the notion that absolute power will corrupt, but that people — ordinary people  — are fundamentally good; that they value family and friendship, faith and the dignity of hard work; and that with appropriate checks and balances, governments can reflect this goodness.

I believe that’s the future we must seek together.  To believe in the dignity of every individual, to believe we can bridge our differences, and choose cooperation over conflict — that is not weakness, that is strength.  (Applause.)  It is a practical necessity in this interconnected world.

And our people understand this.  Think of the Liberian doctor who went door-to-door to search for Ebola cases, and to tell families what to do if they show symptoms.  Think of the Iranian shopkeeper who said, after the nuclear deal, “God willing, now we’ll be able to offer many more goods at better prices.”  Think of the Americans who lowered the flag over our embassy in Havana in 1961 — the year I was born — and returned this summer to raise that flag back up.  (Applause.)  One of these men said of the Cuban people, “We could do things for them, and they could do things for us.  We loved them.”  For 50 years, we ignored that fact.

Think of the families leaving everything they’ve known behind, risking barren deserts and stormy waters just to find shelter; just to save their children.  One Syrian refugee who was greeted in Hamburg with warm greetings and shelter, said, “We feel there are still some people who love other people.”

The people of our United Nations are not as different as they are told.  They can be made to fear; they can be taught to hate — but they can also respond to hope.  History is littered with the failure of false prophets and fallen empires who believed that might always makes right, and that will continue to be the case.  You can count on that.  But we are called upon to offer a different type of leadership — leadership strong enough to recognize that nations share common interests and people share a common humanity, and, yes, there are certain ideas and principles that are universal.

That’s what those who shaped the United Nations 70 years ago understood.  Let us carry forward that faith into the future — for it is the only way we can assure that future will be brighter for my children, and for yours.

Thank you very much.




Full text of Pope Francis’ speech to United Nations 2030 Agenda Conference

Mr President,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

Thank you for your kind words. Once again, following a tradition by which I feel honored, the Secretary General of the United Nations has invited the Pope to address this distinguished assembly of nations. In my own name, and that of the entire Catholic community, I wish to express to you, Mr. Ban Ki-moon, my heartfelt gratitude.

I greet the Heads of State and Heads of Government present, as well as the ambassadors, diplomats and political and technical officials accompanying them, the personnel of the United Nations engaged in this 70th Session of the General Assembly, the personnel of the various programs and agencies of the United Nations family, and all those who, in one way or another, take part in this meeting. Through you, I also greet the citizens of all the nations represented in this hall. I thank you, each and all, for your efforts in the service of mankind.

This is the fifth time that a Pope has visited the United Nations. I follow in the footsteps of my predecessors Paul VI, in1965, John Paul II, in 1979 and 1995, and my most recent predecessor, now Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, in 2008. All of them expressed their great esteem for the Organization, which they considered the appropriate juridical and political response to this present moment of history, marked by our technical ability to overcome distances and frontiers and, apparently, to overcome all natural limits to the exercise of power. An essential response, inasmuch as technological power, in the hands of nationalistic or falsely universalist ideologies, is capable of perpetrating tremendous atrocities. I can only reiterate the appreciation expressed by my predecessors, in reaffirming the importance which the Catholic Church attaches to this Institution and the hope which she places in its activities.

The United Nations is presently celebrating its 70th anniversary. The history of this organized community of states is one of important common achievements over a period of unusually fast-paced changes. Without claiming to be exhaustive, we can mention the codification and development of international law, the establishment of international norms regarding human rights, advances in humanitarian law, the resolution of numerous conflicts, operations of peace-keeping and reconciliation, and any number of other accomplishments in every area of international activity and endeavor. All these achievements are lights which help to dispel the darkness of the disorder caused by unrestrained ambitions and collective forms of selfishness. Certainly, many grave problems remain to be resolved, yet it is clear that, without all those interventions on the international level, mankind would not have been able to survive the unchecked use of its own possibilities. Every one of these political, juridical and technical advances is a path towards attaining the ideal of human fraternity and a means for its greater realization.

For this reason I pay homage to all those men and women whose loyalty and self-sacrifice have benefitted humanity as a whole in these past seventy years. In particular, I would recall today those who gave their lives for peace and reconciliation among peoples, from Dag Hammarskjöld to the many United Nations officials at every level who have been killed in the course of humanitarian missions, and missions of peace and reconciliation.

Beyond these achievements, the experience of the past 70 years has made it clear that reform and adaptation to the times is always necessary in the pursuit of the ultimate goal of granting all countries, without exception, a share in, and a genuine and equitable influence on, decision-making processes. The need for greater equity is especially true in the case of those bodies with effective executive capability, such as the Security Council, the Financial Agencies and the groups or mechanisms specifically created to deal with economic crises. This will help limit every kind of abuse or usury, especially where developing countries are concerned. The International Financial Agencies are should care for the sustainable development of countries and should ensure that they are not subjected to oppressive lending systems which, far from promoting progress, subject people to mechanisms which generate greater poverty, exclusion and dependence.

The work of the United Nations, according to the principles set forth in the Preamble and the first Articles of its founding Charter, can be seen as the development and promotion of the rule of law, based on the realization that justice is an essential condition for achieving the ideal of universal fraternity. In this context, it is helpful to recall that the limitation of power is an idea implicit in the concept of law itself. To give to each his own, to cite the classic definition of justice, means that no human individual or group can consider itself absolute, permitted to bypass the dignity and the rights of other individuals or their social groupings.

The effective distribution of power (political, economic, defense-related, technological, etc.) among a plurality of subjects, and the creation of a juridical system for regulating claims and interests, are one concrete way of limiting power. Yet today’s world presents us with many false rights and – at the same time – broad sectors which are vulnerable, victims of power badly exercised: for example, the natural environment and the vast ranks of the excluded. These sectors are closely interconnected and made increasingly fragile by dominant political and economic relationships.

That is why their rights must be forcefully affirmed, by working to protect the environment and by putting an end to exclusion.

First, it must be stated that a true “right of the environment” does exist, for two reasons. First, because we human beings are part of the environment. We live in communion with it, since the environment itself entails ethical limits which human activity must acknowledge and respect. Man, for all his remarkable gifts, which “are signs of a uniqueness which transcends the spheres of physics and biology” (Laudato Si’, 81), is at the same time a part of these spheres. He possesses a body shaped by physical, chemical and biological elements, and can only survive and develop if the ecological environment is favorable. Any harm done to the environment, therefore, is harm done to humanity.

Second, because every creature, particularly a living creature, has an intrinsic value, in its existence, its life, its beauty and its interdependence with other creatures. We Christians, together with the other monotheistic religions, believe that the universe is the fruit of a loving decision by the Creator, who permits man respectfully to use creation for the good of his fellow men and for the glory of the Creator; he is not authorized to abuse it, much less to destroy it. In all religions, the environment is a fundamental good (cf. ibid.).

The misuse and destruction of the environment are also accompanied by a relentless process of exclusion. In effect, a selfish and boundless thirst for power and material prosperity leads both to the misuse of available natural resources and to the exclusion of the weak and disadvantaged, either because they are differently abled (handicapped), or because they lack adequate information and technical expertise, or are incapable of decisive political action. Economic and social exclusion is a complete denial of human fraternity and a grave offense against human rights and the environment. The poorest are those who suffer most from such offenses, for three serious reasons: they are cast off by society, forced to live off what is discarded and suffer unjustly from the abuse of the environment. They are part of today’s widespread and quietly growing “culture of waste”.

The dramatic reality this whole situation of exclusion and inequality, with its evident effects, has led me, in union with the entire Christian people and many others, to take stock of my grave responsibility in this regard and to speak out, together with all those who are seeking urgently-needed and effective solutions. The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development at the World Summit, which opens today, is an important sign of hope. I am similarly confident that the Paris Conference on Climatic Change will secure fundamental and effective agreements.

Solemn commitments, however, are not enough, even though they are a necessary step toward solutions. The classic definition of justice which I mentioned earlier contains as one of its essential elements a constant and perpetual will: Iustitia est constans et perpetua voluntas ius sum cuique tribuendi. Our world demands of all government leaders a will which is effective, practical and constant, concrete steps and immediate measures for preserving and improving the natural environment and thus putting an end as quickly as possible to the phenomenon of social and economic exclusion, with its baneful consequences: human trafficking, the marketing of human organs and tissues, the sexual exploitation of boys and girls, slave labor, including prostitution, the drug and weapons trade, terrorism and international organized crime. Such is the magnitude of these situations and their toll in innocent lives, that we must avoid every temptation to fall into a declarationist nominalism which would assuage our consciences. We need to ensure that our institutions are truly effective in the struggle against all these scourges.

The number and complexity of the problems require that we possess technical instruments of verification. But this involves two risks. We can rest content with the bureaucratic exercise of drawing up long lists of good proposals – goals, objectives and statistical indicators – or we can think that a single theoretical and aprioristic solution will provide an answer to all the challenges. It must never be forgotten that political and economic activity is only effective when it is understood as a prudential activity, guided by a perennial concept of justice and constantly conscious of the fact that, above and beyond our plans and programs, we are dealing with real men and women who live, struggle and suffer, and are often forced to live in great poverty, deprived of all rights.

To enable these real men and women to escape from extreme poverty, we must allow them to be dignified agents of their own destiny. Integral human development and the full exercise of human dignity cannot be imposed. They must be built up and allowed to unfold for each individual, for every family, in communion with others, and in a right relationship with all those areas in which human social life develops – friends, communities, towns and cities, schools, businesses and unions, provinces, nations, etc. This presupposes and requires the right to education – also for girls (excluded in certain places) – which is ensured first and foremost by respecting and reinforcing the primary right of the family to educate its children, as well as the right of churches and social groups to support and assist families in the education of their children. Education conceived in this way is the basis for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and for reclaiming the environment.

At the same time, government leaders must do everything possible to ensure that all can have the minimum spiritual and material means needed to live in dignity and to create and support a family, which is the primary cell of any social development. In practical terms, this absolute minimum has three names: lodging, labor, and land; and one spiritual name: spiritual freedom, which includes religious freedom, the right to education and other civil rights.

For all this, the simplest and best measure and indicator of the implementation of the new agenda for development will be effective, practical and immediate access, on the part of all, to essential material and spiritual goods: housing, dignified and properly remunerated employment, adequate food and drinking water; religious freedom and, more generally, spiritual freedom and education. These pillars of integral human development have a common foundation, which is the right to life and, more generally, what we could call the right to existence of human nature itself.

The ecological crisis, and the large-scale destruction of biodiversity, can threaten the very existence of the human species. The baneful consequences of an irresponsible mismanagement of the global economy, guided only by ambition for wealth and power, must serve as a summons to a forthright reflection on man: “man is not only a freedom which he creates for himself. Man does not create himself. He is spirit and will, but also nature” (Benedict XVI, Address to the Bundestag, 22 September 2011, cited in Laudato Si’, 6). Creation is compromised “where we ourselves have the final word… The misuse of creation begins when we no longer recognize any instance above ourselves, when we see nothing else but ourselves” (ID. Address to the Clergy of the Diocese of Bolzano-Bressanone, 6 August 2008, cited ibid.). Consequently, the defense of the environment and the fight against exclusion demand that we recognize a moral law written into human nature itself, one which includes the natural difference between man and woman (cf. Laudato Si’, 155), and absolute respect for life in all its stages and dimensions (cf. ibid., 123, 136).

Without the recognition of certain incontestable natural ethical limits and without the immediate implementation of those pillars of integral human development, the ideal of “saving succeeding generations from the scourge of war” (Charter of the United Nations, Preamble), and “promoting social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom” (ibid.), risks becoming an unattainable illusion, or, even worse, idle chatter which serves as a cover for all kinds of abuse and corruption, or for carrying out an ideological colonization by the imposition of anomalous models and lifestyles which are alien to people’s identity and, in the end, irresponsible.

War is the negation of all rights and a dramatic assault on the environment. If we want true integral human development for all, we must work tirelessly to avoid war between nations and between peoples.

To this end, there is a need to ensure the uncontested rule of law and tireless recourse to negotiation, mediation and arbitration, as proposed by the Charter of the United Nations, which constitutes truly a fundamental juridical norm. The experience of these seventy years since the founding of the United Nations in general, and in particular the experience of these first fifteen years of the third millennium, reveal both the effectiveness of the full application of international norms and the ineffectiveness of their lack of enforcement.

When the Charter of the United Nations is respected and applied with transparency and sincerity, and without ulterior motives, as an obligatory reference point of justice and not as a means of masking spurious intentions, peaceful results will be obtained. When, on the other hand, the norm is considered simply as an instrument to be used whenever it proves favorable, and to be avoided when it is not, a true Pandora’s box is opened, releasing uncontrollable forces which gravely harm defenseless populations, the cultural milieu and even the biological environment.

he Preamble and the first Article of the Charter of the United Nations set forth the foundations of the international juridical framework: peace, the pacific solution of disputes and the development of friendly relations between the nations. Strongly opposed to such statements, and in practice denying them, is the constant tendency to the proliferation of arms, especially weapons of mass distraction, such as nuclear weapons. An ethics and a law based on the threat of mutual destruction – and possibly the destruction of all mankind – are self-contradictory and an affront to the entire framework of the United Nations, which would end up as “nations united by fear and distrust”. There is urgent need to work for a world free of nuclear weapons, in full application of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, in letter and spirit, with the goal of a complete prohibition of these weapons.

The recent agreement reached on the nuclear question in a sensitive region of Asia and the Middle East is proof of the potential of political good will and of law, exercised with sincerity, patience and constancy. I express my hope that this agreement will be lasting and efficacious, and bring forth the desired fruits with the cooperation of all the parties involved.

In this sense, hard evidence is not lacking of the negative effects of military and political interventions which are not coordinated between members of the international community. For this reason, while regretting to have to do so, I must renew my repeated appeals regarding to the painful situation of the entire Middle East, North Africa and other African countries, where Christians, together with other cultural or ethnic groups, and even members of the majority religion who have no desire to be caught up in hatred and folly, have been forced to witness the destruction of their places of worship, their cultural and religious heritage, their houses and property, and have faced the alternative either of fleeing or of paying for their adhesion to good and to peace by their own lives, or by enslavement.

These realities should serve as a grave summons to an examination of conscience on the part of those charged with the conduct of international affairs. Not only in cases of religious or cultural persecution, but in every situation of conflict, as in Ukraine, Syria, Iraq, Libya, South Sudan and the Great Lakes region, real human beings take precedence over partisan interests, however legitimate the latter may be. In wars and conflicts there are individual persons, our brothers and sisters, men and women, young and old, boys and girls who weep, suffer and die. Human beings who are easily discarded when our only response is to draw up lists of problems, strategies and disagreements.

As I wrote in my letter to the Secretary-General of the United Nations on 9 August 2014, “the most basic understanding of human dignity compels the international community, particularly through the norms and mechanisms of international law, to do all that it can to stop and to prevent further systematic violence against ethnic and religious minorities” and to protect innocent peoples.

Along the same lines I would mention another kind of conflict which is not always so open, yet is silently killing millions of people. Another kind of war experienced by many of our societies as a result of the narcotics trade. A war which is taken for granted and poorly fought. Drug trafficking is by its very nature accompanied by trafficking in persons, money laundering, the arms trade, child exploitation and other forms of corruption. A corruption which has penetrated to different levels of social, political, military, artistic and religious life, and, in many cases, has given rise to a parallel structure which threatens the credibility of our institutions.

I began this speech recalling the visits of my predecessors. I would hope that my words will be taken above all as a continuation of the final words of the address of Pope Paul VI; although spoken almost exactly fifty years ago, they remain ever timely. “The hour has come when a pause, a moment of recollection, reflection, even of prayer, is absolutely needed so that we may think back over our common origin, our history, our common destiny. The appeal to the moral conscience of man has never been as necessary as it is today… For the danger comes neither from progress nor from science; if these are used well, they can help to solve a great number of the serious problems besetting mankind (Address to the United Nations Organization, 4 October 1965). Among other things, human genius, well applied, will surely help to meet the grave challenges of ecological deterioration and of exclusion. As Paul VI said: “The real danger comes from man, who has at his disposal ever more powerful instruments that are as well fitted to bring about ruin as they are to achieve lofty conquests” (ibid.).

The common home of all men and women must continue to rise on the foundations of a right understanding of universal fraternity and respect for the sacredness of every human life, of every man and every woman, the poor, the elderly, children, the infirm, the unborn, the unemployed, the abandoned, those considered disposable because they are only considered as part of a statistic. This common home of all men and women must also be built on the understanding of a certain sacredness of created nature.

Such understanding and respect call for a higher degree of wisdom, one which accepts transcendence, rejects the creation of an all-powerful élite, and recognizes that the full meaning of individual and collective life is found in selfless service to others and in the sage and respectful use of creation for the common good. To repeat the words of Paul VI, “the edifice of modern civilization has to be built on spiritual principles, for they are the only ones capable not only of supporting it, but of shedding light on it” (ibid.).

El Gaucho Martín Fierro, a classic of literature in my native land, says: “Brothers should stand by each other, because this is the first law; keep a true bond between you always, at every time – because if you fight among yourselves, you’ll be devoured by those outside”.

The contemporary world, so apparently connected, is experiencing a growing and steady social fragmentation, which places at risk “the foundations of social life” and consequently leads to “battles over conflicting interests” (Laudato Si’, 229).

The present time invites us to give priority to actions which generate new processes in society, so as to bear fruit in significant and positive historical events (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 223). We cannot permit ourselves to postpone “certain agendas” for the future. The future demands of us critical and global decisions in the face of worldwide conflicts which increase the number of the excluded and those in need.

The praiseworthy international juridical framework of the United Nations Organization and of all its activities, like any other human endeavor, can be improved, yet it remains necessary; at the same time it can be the pledge of a secure and happy future for future generations. And so it will, if the representatives of the States can set aside partisan and ideological interests, and sincerely strive to serve the common good. I pray to Almighty God that this will be the case, and I assure you of my support and my prayers, and the support and prayers of all the faithful of the Catholic Church, that this Institution, all its member States, and each of its officials, will always render an effective service to mankind, a service respectful of diversity and capable of bringing out, for sake of the common good, the best in each people and in every individual.

Upon all of you, and the peoples you represent, I invoke the blessing of the Most High, and all peace and prosperity. Thank you.




2030 Agenda Threatens Our Way of Life

If you had a time machine and could travel back to 1992 as the UN’s Earth Summit was underway, and you knew what you know now about Agenda 21, imagine the actions you could take to stop it in its tracks. You wouldn’t have to wonder what the NGOs who created it had in mind. You wouldn’t have to trust the news media to tell you the details. You would know, just as the NGO’s, Nancy Pelosi and all the others openly told you, Agenda 21 is a “comprehensive blue print” for the reorganization of human society.

They told you then, without hesitation, that Agenda 21 was aimed at destroying free enterprise. That is was a clarion call for humans to live on less. That the Earth could no longer sustain the United States of America. That’s what they told us, but so many weren’t listening. It took over 15 years to most to finally grasp it. And that was only after it was firmly entrenched in every government agency, every community plan, and every school curriculum. So much so than many now say it is impossible to combat. They whine that it’s a done deal.

Well, guess what, Agenda 21 is not a done deal and one of the main forces to recognize that fact is the UN itself, along with a mob of NGOs. And because it is not a done deal, they are all planning a new massive gathering to reboot Agenda 21 and force it across the finish line.

Over the weekend of September 25 – 27, 2015, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City (just as in the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Brazil) thousands of delegates, UN diplomats, representatives of Non-governmental Organizations, heads of state and the Pope, will converge to present a new fifteen-year plan entitled “Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.”

Just as in 1992, they are openly telling us what the plan includes and how they intend to put it in force. The preamble to the plan says, “All countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, WILL implement this plan.” It goes on to say, “We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind.”

That, my friends, is a direct challenge and a threat to anyone who dares to disagree with the plan or stand in their way. They promise us that they “WILL” do it and it will be forced on everyone. Our experience with Agenda 21 over the past 23 years tells us what to expect.

Here are the seventeen goals to be presented and what they really mean:

Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere. The only answer the plan offers for eliminating poverty is redistribution of wealth. The document calls for “equal rights to economic resources.” That means government is claiming an absolute power take away anything that belongs to you to give to whomever it deems more deserving. That is government-sanctioned theft. These are only Band-Aids that solve nothing. Tomorrow those on the bread lines will still need more. The result is more poor. There is not a single idea in these plans to give the poor a way to earn their own wealth so they no longer need government handouts.

Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture. UN documents go into great detail on controlling food supplies. They detail enforcing “sustainable farming tactics” which have been proven to force up the cost of food production while decreasing yield. It is basically the old Soviet practice of farm control that turned the bread basket of the world into mass starvation. The document details the use of government controlled seed and plant banks… “to ensure access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge as internationally agreed.” In other words, our future food sources will be put into the hands of politically connected bureaucrats who have never been on a farm. Smart.

Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being of all at all ages. This means cradle to grave control over how and where we live and what we are permitted to eat. The healthy lives they promote means basically forcing us out of our cars and into walking and riding bikes as we are relocated into controlled high rise apartment buildings sanctioned by government. Obamacare, anyone?

Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. We learned a long time ago that lifelong learning is only necessary as a means to continually apply behavior modification practices to assure we maintain the desired attitudes, values and beliefs to live in a global village. Give the children a well-rounded academic knowledge in grade school and they will be able to take care of educating themselves on any new developments that arise in their lives.

Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. The rainbow flag flies as we ignore Shariah law and its war on women.

Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation. Ask California how sustainable water control is working for them as these policies have torn down water systems and dams to “free the rivers.” The original pioneers found the land to be a desert. They built a sophisticated water control system that resulted in an emerald green paradise. Now, as Sustainable policies are being enforced, they are witnessing the return of the desert, destroying productive land. Meanwhile, across the nation, the EPA is moving to take control of all the water in the United States. Control the water, control the population.

Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. Seriously? Their solution is to ban oil and enforce wind and solar power. Every study across the nation and around the world has proven that these “modern” energy sources are unreliable. They force up the cost of energy and some reports say they are making people sick when forced to live under the wind turbines. Moreover, the carnage of the birds and bats that are being chopped up and fried by these “sustainable” energy sources goes against everything environmentalists told us about protecting species.

Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all. One thing our 23 years of Agenda 21 have proven, there is no economic growth. Several nations in Europe that really tried to live by the sustainable guidelines on energy and water controls are now dumping those programs as fast as they can to save their economies. And who decides what is “productive” or “decent” work? Do we leave it to the bureaucrats to decide?

Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation. Oh come now. Sustainable industrialization means destroyed industry. No real industry can remain in business under a government managed economy with its shifting rules and constant increase in taxes. Government doesn’t create industry or prosperity. Our government’s real job is to provide protection of the market place so real innovators are free to create new ideas, industries and opportunities. Government itself is a job killer when it gets in the way.

Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries. This is another form of redistribution of wealth that forces industries from first world to third world nations. This is done by using oppressive sustainable policies to drive up production costs, forcing companies to take their factories to the poorer nations. The second trick is to exempt those poorer nations from the very environmental rules and regulations that caused the factories to move in the first place. Can anyone explain how this helps the environment? It doesn’t. It simply makes everyone equally poor. This is also an assault on national sovereignty.

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. This is Smart Growth which promises a utopia of families and neighbors playing and working together, riding bikes, walking to work in stress free communities. It really means the end of private property rights, single family homes, and stack and pack high rises where residents are over taxed, over regulated, rents are high and individual thoughts and actions are viewed as a threat to the “well-ordered society.” And by the way, the American Planning Association did a study to see if their smart growth plans worked and their own report concluded that Smart Growth doesn’t work.

Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. What more is there to say? Control from the top down.

Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. Here it is! The root of the entire plan. Climate Change. How many scientific reports do real scientists have to present to show this is the greatest scam ever devised to create a reason for government to control every aspect of our lives? Well, here, let the Global Warming scare mongers tell you their true purpose in their own words:
“No matter if the science of global warming is all phony – climate change provides the greatest opportunity to bring about justice and equality in the world.” Christine Stewart (former Canadian Minister of the Environment). Justice built on a lie? And here is another quote to make it clear. “We’ve got to ride this global warming issue. Even if the theory of global warming is wrong, we will be doing the right thing in terms of economic and environmental policy.” Timothy Wirth (President, UN Foundation). The end justifies the means!

Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. Control the water, control society. This one is really aimed at destroying the oil industry in order to enforce wind and solar power. This is the UN pounding its chest to become the central global government it has always sought to be. It has no more right to the seas than it does to the air we breath or the surface of the moon.

Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss. Have you been watching the news as the greatest fires in history are destroying millions of acres of forests? Why is this happening? Because of sustainable forest management that refuses to allow the removal of dead trees from the forest floor. This creates as much of ten feet of kindling that makes massively hot and unmanageable fires. That kindling is so thick that even small animals have a hard time getting through. If you want to save a forest, send an environmentalist back to his high rise in New York City where he belongs.

Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels. This is Social Justice which really means social engineering. Have you ever once witnessed an “effective” or “accountable” institution coming out of the United Nations? By its very nature, the UN is unaccountable. Who would be the entity to oversee that accountability? Every one of these programs outlined in the 2030 Agenda creates money, power and unaccountability at every level of government. That is why government is now running out of control and people are feeling so hopeless in trying to deal with their governments. Goal 16 should be named the “Foxes Running the Hen House” goal.

Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development. This means the re-boot of Agenda 21, because that was the original “global partnership.” This goal is a call for all of the treaties, plans and schemes devised in the massive UN meetings to be made the law of the globe. It is total global government and it is a sure highway to misery, destruction of human society, individual thought, motivation and dreams.

In 1992 they told us that Agenda 21 was just a suggestion. Today, after experiencing the “wrenching transformation” of our society that Al Gore called for, we know it was much more than that. And we have suffered the consequences as our economy has plummeted, as the middle class is disappearing, jobs are now existent and the world is in turmoil.

Now the power elite which prey on the poor and helpless are determined to finish the job. They are fast moving toward the goal of eliminating individual nation states; controlling individual actions and wiping private property ownership from the face of the Earth. Their goal is to make us all “equal” in the same chains to assure none of us can disrupt their well ordered utopian nightmare.

Well, now our time machine has brought us back from 1992 to the present. As we disembark, one voice should be ringing in our ears loud and clear from the 1992 Earth Summit. In a clear and concise voice he warned us of what Agenda 21 was designed to do. He said, “Isn’t the only hope for the planet that the industrialized nations collapse? Isn’t it out responsibility to bring that about?” And remember, that wasn’t said by just an interested bystander. It was from the official statement of the Chairman of the Earth Summit, Maurice Strong.

So now, we are back in good old 2015 as the same forces are about to introduce the 2030 Agenda. We now have the advantage of knowing full well what it is and its intended affect on our lives. They have told us clearly, right in its title: “Transform the World.”

The 2030 Agenda is to be built on the ruins and desolation of a thousand such schemes for control over human life. Each time they have failed and each time they have come back with a new “plan.” The 2030 Agenda is Agenda 21 re-booted. But this time you and I don’t have an excuse to ignore it. We know what it is from the start. Now we have a new opportunity and the obligation to stop it dead in its tracks.

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