Concerns Rise Over China’s Global Exports Of Surveillance Tech

Most writers and analysts have no awareness of Technocracy in China, even though it is acting in perfect accord with the “science of social engineering”, and exporting its population control systems to anyone who will take them. ⁃ TN Editor

China has created a vast surveillance apparatus at home consisting of millions of cameras equipped with facial recognition technology.

Now, some of the country’s largest firms have signed deals around the world to sell their tech abroad.

Experts raised concerns about data being siphoned back to China, authoritarian regimes using the tech to increase their power and ultimately the Chinese Communist Party having more influence abroad.

China’s push to export its surveillance technology via some of its biggest companies, including to liberal democracies, has raised concerns because of the risk of data being siphoned back to Beijing and the growing influence of the Communist Party, experts told CNBC.

The world’s second-largest economy has built a vast surveillance state comprised of millions of cameras powered by facial recognition software. The devices, perched on lamp posts and outside buildings and streets, are able to recognize individuals.

Some of China’s most valuable technology firms have been involved in such projects across the country. But this technology is now being exported as the nation’s technology firms expand their global footprint.

Chinese tech companies — particularly Huawei, Hikvision, Dahua, and ZTE — supply artificial intelligence surveillance technology in 63 countries, according to a September report by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace think tank. Of those nations, 36 have signed onto China’s massive infrastructure project, the Belt and Road Initiative, the report said, adding that Huawei supplies technology to the highest number of countries.

Some of these so-called “smart city” projects, which include surveillance technologies, are underway in Western countries, particularly in Europe, including Germany, Spain and France, according to analysis by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI).

Experts warned of a number of risks including potential access to data by the Chinese government.

“I think that sometimes there is an assumption that ‘oh well when we roll out this technology we aren’t going to use it in a negative way, we are using it to provide services or we are using it in a way that is seen as acceptable, socially acceptable in our society,’” Samantha Hoffman, a fellow at ASPI’s Cyber Centre, told CNBC’s “Beyond the Valley” podcast.

“But actually (we) can’t be sure of that because the difference isn’t necessarily how the technology is being deployed, but who has access to the data it’s collecting,” she said. “If it’s a Chinese company like Huawei, and that … data goes back to China and can be used by the party in whatever way that it chooses.”

Chinese laws and regulations

Hoffman cited laws in China that appear to compel Chinese firms to hand over data to the government, if asked. She did not accuse Huawei of wrongdoing, but just used the company as an example.

Earlier this year, Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said he would “definitely say no” to any request for customer data from Beijing.

“I think we don’t even quite understand the full scale of the problem that we are dealing with when it comes to Chinese surveillance technology when it is exported. It’s not just that other regimes can use it in similar ways, it’s that when it’s exported the (Chinese Communist) Party can attach its interests as well,” Hoffman added.

Nowhere is China’s surveillance state more visible than in Xinjiang, home to China’s Uighur minority. The territory has made headlines for its detention and “re-education” camps that hold an estimated 1.5 million Muslims, many of them for violating what Amnesty International describes as a “highly restrictive and discriminatory” law that China says is designed to combat extremism.

Maya Wang, a China researcher at Human Rights Watch, focuses on Xinjiang and the surveillance activities there. She warned of the dangers of China’s surveillance technology going to authoritarian states.

“I think the worse future could be these governments adopting these technologies and adding that arsenal to the existing ones for the control of people,” Wang told CNBC.

Earlier this year, an ASPI report highlighted other concerns from China exporting its surveillance tech, including being able to undermine democracies, get an edge on new technologies and in military areas.

Read full story here…

 




Penn State: Forget the Constitution, It’s Analytics, Algorithms And Social Credit Scoring

Technocracy is already applying undue pressure against the Constitution and the Rule of Law. Social Credit Scoring is a personalized tool of behavior modification that obviates the need for external controls. ⁃ TN Editor
 

A.I. driven social scores to supplant constitution?

Professor Larry Backer of Penn State University writes in a 2018 paper that resistance to social credit systems in the west could be dissolved when the masses are “socialized… as a collective” and “…the great culture management machinery of Western society develop a narrative in which such activity is naturalized within Western culture.”

A 2018 paper written by prominent law professor Larry Backer of Penn State discussed the ways in which a social credit system could be implemented in the west. Backer writes that the shift in law with this system will “…change the focus of public law from constitution and rule of law to analytics and algorithm…”

In the paper, titled “Next Generation Law: Data Driven Governance and Accountability Based Regulatory Systems in the West, and Social Credit Regimes in China“, Backer describes moves to social credit in the west as “fractured”, but gives guidance on how societal norms could be steadily pushed to accept this system.

Backer proposes that the “great culture management machinery” of the west normalize the idea of social credit and sharing private data. Backer writes:

“But is it possible to socialize the masses, or even mass democracy as a collective, to embrace this pattern of data disclosure beyond these
immediately self-serving closed loop systems? Would it be possible for the state to develop systems for the enforcement of laws (criminal and regulatory) that depends on intelligence by inducing the masses to serve as positive contributors of data necessary for enforcement or regulation? The answer, in Western liberal democracies, may depend on the ability of the great culture management machinery of Western society– its television, movies and other related media–to develop a narrative in which such activity is naturalized within Western culture“.

As Big Tech and artificial intelligence creep further into our lives, a grid of high tech surveillance has entangled us. As if to pacify resistance, these systems (Google home, Apple watches, Amazon Alexa) offer “convenience” in the form of targeted ads, personalized content and other features.

In reality, this system is meant to determine whether or not you will be allowed to function in modern society.

The Trump admin is reportedly considering using this surveillance grid to monitor the population for signs of mental illness, triggering authorities to confiscate firearms from “dangerous individuals”.

In 2013, Old-Thinker News asked the question “Will Insurance Companies Use Smart Appliances to Monitor “Unhealthy” Habits?

As this 2013 Wall Street Journal article stated, your insurance company:

“…already knows whether you’ve been taking your meds, getting your teeth cleaned and going for regular medical checkups. Now some employers or their insurance companies are tracking what staffers eat, where they shop and how much weight they’re putting on — and taking action to keep them in line.”

Artificial Intelligence, programmed by power hungry individuals, is steadily taking over our society. It is already censoring political opinions. It will be making medical, education, and financial decisions. Humans are to be sidelined. The social credit system will be watching you closely for any deviant behavior. If you aren’t careful, you will become an outcast. Access to food, transportation and medical care will be denied.

Read full story here…




HARPA: Social Credit (Mental) Scoring For Gun Control?

The Trump Administration has broken the ice on using Social Credit Scoring technology to decide who is mentally stable enough to purchase a weapon. Like a ‘No-Fly’ list, a ‘No-Buy’ list would be based on AI analysis of social media posts. ⁃ TN Editor

The Trump administration is considering a proposal that would use Google, Amazon and Apple to collect data on users who exhibit characteristics of mental illness that could lead to violent behavior, The Washington Post reported Thursday.

The proposal is part of an initiative to create a Health Advanced Research Projects Agency (HARPA), which would be located inside the Health and Human Services Department, the report notes, citing sources inside the administration. The new agency would have a separate budget and the president would be responsible for appointing its director.

HARPA would take after Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, which serves as the research arm for the Pentagon. The idea was first crafted in 2017 but has since gotten a renewed push after mass shootings killed 31 people in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, in August.

The Suzanne Wright Foundation approached the president recently and proposed the agency include a project called Stopping Aberrant Fatal Events by Helping Overcome Mental Extremes, or Safe Home, the report notes, citing two people familiar with the matter.

President Donald Trump has a close relationship with Bob Wright, who founded the foundation after his wife died of cancer. Wright was a former chair of NBC and occupied that position while the president hosted “The Apprentice.” 

HARPA would develop “breakthrough technologies with high specificity and sensitivity for early diagnosis of neuropsychiatric violence,” according to a copy of the proposal. “A multi-modality solution, along with real-time data analytics, is needed to achieve such an accurate diagnosis.”

The document lists several technologies that could be employed to help collect information, including Apple Watches, Amazon Echo and Google Home. Geoffrey Ling, the lead scientific adviser on HARPA, told reporters Thursday the plan would require enormous amounts of data and “scientific rigor.”

He added: “Everybody would be a volunteer. We’re not inventing new science here. We’re analyzing it so we can develop new approaches.” The White House declined to provide the Daily Caller News Foundation with a statement but sources told WaPo that Trump has reacted “very positively” to the proposal — it is unclear if he has seen the Safe Home idea.

Read full story here…