Smart Cities Could Signal The End of Democarcy

TN Note: This important story from The Guardian in the UK appeared in December, 2014, but is important to understand the risks of so-called “smart cities”.  The Smart City concept is pushed mostly by big engineering, technology and consulting organizations, such as Siemens, Honeywell, IBM, Accenture, etc.  Smart City investment is forecast to hit $2 trillion by 2020.

A woman drives to the outskirts of the city and steps directly on to a train; her electric car then drives itself off to park and recharge. A man has a heart attack in the street; the emergency services send a drone equipped with a defibrillator to arrive crucial minutes before an ambulance can. A family of flying maintenance robots lives atop an apartment block – able to autonomously repair cracks or leaks and clear leaves from the gutters.

Such utopian, urban visions help drive the “smart city” rhetoric that has, for the past decade or so, been promulgated most energetically by big technology, engineering and consulting companies. The movement is predicated on ubiquitous wireless broadband and the embedding of computerised sensors into the urban fabric, so that bike racks and lamp posts, CCTV and traffic lights, as well as geeky home appliances such as internet fridges and remote-controlled heating systems, become part of the so-called “internet of things” (the global market for which is now estimated at $1.7tn). Better living through biochemistry gives way to a dream of better living through data. You can even take an MSc in Smart Cities at University College, London.

Yet there are dystopian critiques, too, of what this smart city vision might mean for the ordinary citizen. The phrase itself has sparked a rhetorical battle between techno-utopianists and postmodern flâneurs: should the city be an optimised panopticon, or a melting pot of cultures and ideas?

nd what role will the citizen play? That of unpaid data-clerk, voluntarily contributing information to an urban database that is monetised by private companies? Is the city-dweller best visualised as a smoothly moving pixel, travelling to work, shops and home again, on a colourful 3D graphic display? Or is the citizen rightfully an unpredictable source of obstreperous demands and assertions of rights? “Why do smart cities offer only improvement?” asks the architect Rem Koolhaas. “Where is the possibility of transgression?”

The smart city concept arguably dates back at least as far as the invention of automated traffic lights, which were first deployed in 1922 in Houston, Texas. Leo Hollis, author of Cities Are Good For You, says the one unarguably positive achievement of smart city-style thinking in modern times is the train indicator boards on the London Underground. But in the last decade, thanks to the rise of ubiquitous internet connectivity and the miniaturisation of electronics in such now-common devices as RFID tags, the concept seems to have crystallised into an image of the city as a vast, efficient robot – a vision that originated, according toAdam Greenfield at LSE Cities, with giant technology companies such as IBM, Cisco and Software AG, all of whom hoped to profit from big municipal contracts.

“The notion of the smart city in its full contemporary form appears to have originated within these businesses,” Greenfield notes in his 2013 book Against the Smart City, “rather than with any party, group or individual recognised for their contributions to the theory or practice of urban planning.”

Read full story here…

Related Articles That You Might Like

Leave a Reply

2 Comments on "Smart Cities Could Signal The End of Democarcy"

Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Christine Erikson
Guest

something I never see is room for pets and children and aged who can’t climb a ladder to a bunk bed in a tiny room.

Daniel
Guest

Smart city? Sounds like a smart prison. The smartest prison is a prison whose prisoners don’t realize they’re in a prison.

wpDiscuz

The only Authoritative source for

Exposing Technocracy

Stories curated daily from around the world

Subscribe and get the digest!

No SPAM! We will not share your email with any 3rd party.

Thank You for Subscribing!

 

If you don't receive a confirmation email within a few

minutes, please check  your spam/junk folder.

Wath for a confirmation email.