U.S. Demand For Cricket Protein Is Surging

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Like it or not, expect cricket protein to start showing up in food items in your local grocery, so if you don’t like crickets, you will need to read the list of ingredients.  TN Editor

At Tomorrow’s Harvest farm, you won’t find acres of land on which animals graze, or rows of corn, or bales of hay. Just stacks of boxes in a basement and the summery song of thousands of chirping crickets.

It’s one of a growing number of operations raising crickets for human consumption that these farmers say is more ecologically sound than meat but acknowledge is sure to bug some people out.

Once consumers get beyond the ick factor, they say, there are a lot of benefits to consuming bugs.

“We don’t need everybody to eat insects,” said Robert Nathan Allen, founder and director of Little Herds, an educational nonprofit in Austin, Texas, that promotes the use of insects for human food and animal feed. “The point we really like to highlight with the education is that if only a small percent of people add this to their diet, there’s a huge environmental impact.”

Cricket fans say if only 1 percent of the U.S. population substituted even just 1 percent of their meat consumption with insects, millions of gallons of water in drinking and irrigation would be saved, along with thousands of metric tons of greenhouse-gas emissions from machinery and animals.

At least one study finds the claims overstated that crickets are a viable protein source to supplement or replace meat, but bottom line, it generally takes fewer resources to raise and harvest crickets than, say, cattle.

Interest in entomophagy – the consumption of insects – was fueled in part by a 2013 report from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations on the viability of edible insects to help curb world hunger.

Since then, the number of producers of food containing crickets, from protein bars to chip, has jumped from zero to about 20, and cricket farms for human food have grown to about half a dozen in the United States, Allen said.

Read full story here…

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1 Comment on "U.S. Demand For Cricket Protein Is Surging"

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laura ann
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Does food with crickets chirp? (grasshopper incl) If people are desperate enough to eat this stuff, they gotta be third world deprived undernourished folks, who are forced to eat this or starve. Eating oysters shrimp, scallops, fish, from the gulf of Mex. bad for health as gulf is an open sewer. Yet, people are eating gulf seafood after being warned. Squirrels and rabbit would be an option w. lower footprint.

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