Rand Paul: ‘We Can’t Live In Fear Of Our Own Intelligence Community’

Privacy marchPrivacy march, Washington D.C, 2013. Credit: James Bovard

Congress itself is worried about being surveilled by the Intel community, but it does not have the same empathy for citizens at large. What part of the Constitution do they not understand: The Fourth Amendment clearly states, “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”  TN Editor

U.S. intelligence agencies are telling us not to worry about the FISA Amendments Act, a 2008 law that allows the NSA to tap into the communications of “non-U.S. persons” who are outside the U.S., even though this law sidesteps the Fourth Amendment as it allows the NSA to record the emails and phone calls of U.S. citizens who happen to be communicating with people overseas.

How many American citizens is the government listening in on? We don’t know, as the intelligence agencies told Congress they can’t say just how many American citizens they’ve eavesdropped on (without warrants).

Despite this, they say Congress should just renew the controversial section 702 of the Act before it expires in December; in fact, they want it to be made permanent law.

Congress would probably do this too if it wasn’t for the fact that they’ve recently learned their privacy is also at stake. Recent “unmaskings” show that even a congressman’s conversations with a foreign official might go public with their names un-redacted. Then, even if the member of Congress didn’t do anything wrong, what they said and whom they spoke with could quickly be taken out of context by the media outlets that root for the opposing team.

“We cannot live in fear of our own intelligence community,” said Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY). “They have such power to suck up every bit of every transmission, every communication we ever made. We can’t just have them willy-nilly releasing that to the public.”

In this case Paul is not a lone gadfly. Politicians from Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, to Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), aren’t so keen about what this law can do to them. They’ve learned that this is a new age when elected officials, not just privacy advocates, fear not just leaked facts, but innuendo and out-of-context spin from off-camera conversations or email exchanges.

Some Republicans even used a debate at a recent congressional hearing to suggest Obama administration officials had purposely unmasked elected officials and then leaked the info to harm Trump administration officials. Specifically, former National Security Advisor Susan Rice and former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power have been accused of unmasking Trump administration officials and expanding who could see the documents in an effort to get them to leak.

All of this is very new and confusing to our politicians. But, as fiction can gaze just beyond the headlines to show us where we are going and how we might keep our freedom in this changing world, my novel Kill Big Brother takes this plot to its dramatic end. What I found while researching and writing the book is there are ways to keep our intelligence agencies strong enough to protect us while keeping our freedom.

Read full story here…

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7 Comments on "Rand Paul: ‘We Can’t Live In Fear Of Our Own Intelligence Community’"

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Cal
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” FISA Amendments Act, a 2008 law that allows the NSA to tap into the communications of “non-U.S. persons” who are outside the U.S., even though this law sidesteps the Fourth Amendment as it allows the NSA to record the emails and phone calls of U.S. citizens who happen to be communicating with people overseas.” Actually, the SUPREME Law of this land and the supreme (meaning gets followed and enforced before any other) CONTRACT for those that serve within our governments is very clear on EXACTLY what they can do against the people. So when the Fourth Amendment clearly states,… Read more »
Cal
Guest
“How many American citizens is the government listening in on? We don’t know, as the intelligence agencies told Congress they can’t say just how many American citizens they’ve eavesdropped on (without warrants).” It does not matter how many, what matters is that they broke both the supreme law, and their Oath (a felony and Perjury). Those are crimes that require the people who serve within our government at any and every level who do NOT keep the Oath and supreme contract to be charged with the crimes they have committed, prosecuted for them. If found guilty they must serve/pay whatever… Read more »
Cal
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““We cannot live in fear of our own intelligence community,” said Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY). “They have such power to suck up every bit of every transmission, every communication we ever made. We can’t just have them willy-nilly releasing that to the public.”

No they have NO POWERS to do so LAWFULLY. Read the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Declaration of Independence once again to get a REAL knowledge of what those who SERVE WITHIN our governments are ALLOWED to do – it IS in writing.

Cal
Guest
“Despite this, they say Congress should just renew the controversial section 702 of the Act before it expires in December; in fact, they want it to be made permanent law.” How can it be a permanent, or semi-permanent “law” when it is NOT in Pursuance thereof the US Constitution. Don’t lie, call it what it is, *Color of Law, pretend law. *Color of law. The appearance or semblance, without the substance, of legal right. Misuse of power, possessed by virtue of state law and made possible only because wrongdoer is clothed with authority of state, is action taken under “color… Read more »
CP
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Concerned citizens can research and follow the bipartisan congressional Fourth Amendment Caucus. Several founding members are consistent champions for civil liberties and transparency such as Peter DeFazio, Justin Amash, and Tulsi Gabbard – especially DeFazio, outspoken for many years.

https://lofgren.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=398082

https://fourthamendment-poe.house.gov/

Sam Fox
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Underneath the Trump/Russia jive this stuff is going on. I saw a headline about the war on cash, that it’s a war on privacy & freedom. It sure is that! Underneath even that is the ‘chip the people’ movement. You think the surveillance is bad now…just hope, pray & actively oppose the replacement of cash. If convenience is that important…forgetaboutit. Won’t be long till they use the tech to run your life. Driverless cars? Cells on wheels if some one in govt doesn’t like you. That is a bit down the road, but it’s coming. If a gadget has ‘smart’… Read more »
Fred Davis
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Perhaps WE THE PEOPLE MAY GET LUCKY & HAVE A FEW PATRIOTS SERVING US & SPILL ALL THE BEANS ON THAT LIEING BUNCH OF SELF SERVING LAWYERS / OTHERWISE KNOWN AS PUBLIC SERVANTS A.K.A. POLITICIANS

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