Scientists: Edible Plants Being Altered To Carry mRNA Vaccine Payload

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GMO Lettuce and spinach could carry the mRNA vaccine directly into humanity’s food supply, obviating “informed choice”. This follows virus development where a GMO contagious virus would carry the mRNA vaccine. Why are Transhuman scientists so bent on changing the genetic structure of mankind? Humans 2.0. ⁃ TN Editor

Vaccinations can be a controversial subject for many people, especially when it comes to injections. So what if you could replace your next shot with a salad instead? Researchers at the University of California-Riverside are working on a way to grow edible plants that carry the same medication as an mRNA vaccine.

The COVID-19 vaccine is one of the many inoculations which use messenger RNA (mRNA) technology to defeat viruses. They work by teaching cells from the immune system to recognize and attack a certain infectious disease. Unfortunately, mRNA vaccines have to stay in cold storage until use or they lose stability. The UC-Riverside team says if they’re successful, the public could eat plant-based mRNA vaccines — which could also survive at room temperature.

Thanks to a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, researchers are now looking accomplish three goals. First, the team will try to successfully deliver DNA containing mRNA vaccines into plant cells, where they can replicate. Next, the study authors want to show that plants can actually produce enough mRNA to replace a traditional injection. Finally, the team will need to determine the right dosage people will need to eat to properly replace vaccinations.

“Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person,” says Juan Pablo Giraldo, an associate professor in UCR’s Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, in a university release.

“We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their own gardens,” Giraldo adds. “Farmers could also eventually grow entire fields of it.”

Plants are capable of growing more vaccines

Giraldo and a team of scientists from UC-San Diego and Carnegie Mellon University say the key to making edible vaccines are chloroplasts. These are small organs inside plant cells which help convert sunlight into energy.

“They’re tiny, solar-powered factories that produce sugar and other molecules which allow the plant to grow,” Giraldo explains. “They’re also an untapped source for making desirable molecules.”

Previous studies have shown that it’s possible for chloroplasts to express genes which are not a natural part of that plant. Giraldo’s team accomplished this by sending genetic material inside of a protective casing into plant cells.

In the new study, Giraldo teamed with UC-San Diego’s Professor Nicole Steinmetz to use nanotechnology to deliver more genetic material into chloroplasts.

“Our idea is to repurpose naturally occurring nanoparticles, namely plant viruses, for gene delivery to plants,” Steinmetz says. “Some engineering goes into this to make the nanoparticles go to the chloroplasts and also to render them non-infectious toward the plants.”

“One of the reasons I started working in nanotechnology was so I could apply it to plants and create new technology solutions. Not just for food, but for high-value products as well, like pharmaceuticals,” Giraldo adds.

Read full story here…

About the Author

Patrick Wood
Patrick Wood is a leading and critical expert on Sustainable Development, Green Economy, Agenda 21, 2030 Agenda and historic Technocracy. He is the author of Technocracy Rising: The Trojan Horse of Global Transformation (2015) and co-author of Trilaterals Over Washington, Volumes I and II (1978-1980) with the late Antony C. Sutton.
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Ren

Well they threaten to shut us “unvaxxed” out of Their economy. So I’m already growing my non GMO foods against this day.

Karen

This is pure evil from Hell!!

Daryl Michael

MRNA is a death jab!

Rex West

WE ARE ALL DOMED.

Elle

STOP THAT! We are not all doomed. Don’t feed the negative.

chris

…if you think it cannot get more crazy …

Elle

Irresponsible. Completely irresponsible. However, they aren’t going to do much damage at $1/2 million. Consequently, it allows the public to know that the stated focus is not the whole story nor is the funding. And what of the labeling?

Will the criminal class hide their mRNA nano-technology food horror like the refusal to label GMO foods?

Last edited 1 month ago by Elle
Roberta

These criminals are working day and night to prove to themselves that they are gods, that the Christian God and Judaic God does not exist. Just in time for Halloween.

john anderson

Greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world—Jesus is coming back soon.

[…] Scientists: Edible plants being altered to carry mRNA Vaccine Payload so you won’t have to get the “toxic jab” now you can get the vaccine in a “toxic salad”. […]

Laura

This goes to show that there is way more to the vaccine than Covid. Covid is just an excuse to scare us into allowing them to inject what they want into us. They want us all to have gene modifying technology in our bodies. That’s the real plan. Moderna was bragging about this a few months ago on their website, saying that mRNA turns our bodies into “plug and play” systems (their exact words) by making them receptors to whatever they cook up next to modify our DNA. I don’t know if they took it off, but I can’t find… Read more »

joshu

elon said its like uploading a computer programme

WIDE AWAKE

It’s surprising to me that they divulge their name and whereabouts. The arrogance and hubris these traitors to humanity exhibit are a sure sign of their reptilian / mankind origins. They are lurking amongst us everywhere! They are no longer in hiding. WAKE UP HUMANS! We can defeat these demons!

Bob Trahan

Is that why Bill Gates bought out a lot of farm land?

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] Ifølge lektor i botanikk og plantevitenskap, Juan Pablo Giraldo, «Ideelt sett ville en enkelt plante produsere nok mRNA til å vaksinere en enkelt person.» Giraldo sa videre: «Vi tester denne tilnærmingen med spinat og salat og har langsiktige mål om at folk skal dyrke den i hagen sin.» [kilde] […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] Laut Juan Pablo Giraldo, außerordentlicher Professor für Botanik und Pflanzenwissenschaften,  „würde eine einzelne Pflanze im Idealfall genug mRNA produzieren, um eine einzelne Person zu impfen.“ Giraldo fuhr fort: „Wir testen diesen Ansatz mit Spinat und Salat und haben langfristige Ziele, dass die Leute ihn in ihren Gärten anbauen.“ [Quelle]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]

[…] According to associate professor of botany and plant sciences, Juan Pablo Giraldo, “Ideally, a single plant would produce enough mRNA to vaccinate a single person.” Giraldo went on to say, “We are testing this approach with spinach and lettuce and have long-term goals of people growing it in their gardens.” [source]  […]